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Overall survival probability plots a the entire cohort until day 90 following ICU admission; b a comparison between the two surges until day 15 after ICU admission; c landmark analysis comparing the two surges for patients alive at day 15 after ICU admission

Overall survival probability plots a the entire cohort until day 90 following ICU admission; b a comparison between the two surges until day 15 after ICU admission; c landmark analysis comparing the two surges for patients alive at day 15 after ICU admission

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... 15 days was found to be similar for patients during the two surges; the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for survival before 15 days for the second versus first surge was 1.06 (95% CI 0.85-1.32, p = 0.62). Survival after day 15 was found to be worse for patients admitted to ICU during the second surge than for patients admitted during the first surge (Fig. 3). The unadjusted HR for survival after day 15 for the second surge versus first surge was 1.73 (95% CI 1.35-2.22, p < ...

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... The highest mortality rates (40%e80%) are reported in elderly patients admitted to the ICU [14,15,31]. Because of this finding, some intensivists were initially discouraged from admitting elderly patients to the ICU and used age as an exclusion criterion for ICU care [33]. ...
... This choice was justified by ethical consideration to prioritize younger patients in a time of reduced ICU capacity. However, an interesting study by the COVIP group unexpectedly showed that elderly patients admitted to the ICU during the second wave had higher short-and long-term mortality compared to the first wave [14]. Among the other potential explanations, the worse outcome might have been caused by the increased length of time spent in other departments before ICU admission, a hypothesis supported by decreased PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio at ICU admission in the second period [14]. ...
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