Fig 1- uploaded by Niels Hartog
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Outline of the historical
development of MAR in Europe
showing the number of MAR
sites opened or closed per decade
between the 1870s and 2000s

Outline of the historical development of MAR in Europe showing the number of MAR sites opened or closed per decade between the 1870s and 2000s

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Article
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Different types of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes are widely distributed and applied on various scales and for various purposes in the European countries, but a systematic categorization and compilation of data has been missing up to now. The European MAR catalogue presented herein contains various key parameters collected from the availabl...

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