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Our Human-Robot co-learning setup: A ball and maze game is designed to require two players for success; one player per rotation axis of the tray. One axis is tele-operated by a human player, and the other axis by a deep reinforcement learning agent. The game can only be solved through collaboration.

Our Human-Robot co-learning setup: A ball and maze game is designed to require two players for success; one player per rotation axis of the tray. One axis is tele-operated by a human player, and the other axis by a deep reinforcement learning agent. The game can only be solved through collaboration.

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The intuitive collaboration of humans and intelligent robots (embodied AI) in the real-world is an essential objective for many desirable applications of robotics. Whilst there is much research regarding explicit communication, we focus on how humans and robots interact implicitly, on motor adaptation level. We present a real-world setup of a human...

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Context 1
... this paper, we present a real-world setup for studies on how humans and intelligent robotic agents can learn and adapt together for the completion of a non-trivial collaborative motor task. We have designed a human-agent collaborative maze game, see Figure 1, where a tray needs to be tilted to navigate a ball to a goal. The human controls one axis of tilt, and the agent controls the other. ...
Context 2
... 50cm × 50cm square tray is built out of cardboard material, and attached to the UR10 end-effector, through a 3D printed mechanical interface. The tray has barrier walls on all four sides to keep the ball from falling off as well as two obstacle walls, positioned diagonally, with a 9cm opening in the centre (refer to Figure 1 and Figure 2). A 5cm-diameter hole is cut near one of the board's corners, representing the goal for a rolling ball to fall into. ...
Context 3
... game, i.e. the task of rolling the ball from a given start point on the tray, to the goal, is solved purely by rotating the tray around its x-y axes (two orthogonal axes on the tray plane, with the centre of the square tray as the origin -see Figure 2); no rotation around the z-axis, nor translations along any axes is allowed. The human player's commands are sent via a smaller tray that they hold and rotate (Figure 1 and 2). The human tray's orientation is tracked with three optical markers placed on top of it, through a motion capture system consisting of Optitrack Flex 13 cameras (NaturalPoint, Inc. ...
Context 4
... OptiTrack, Corvallis, Oregon, USA). The position of the ball on the tray is similarly tracked via optical markers placed inside it (Figure 1 and 2). ...
Context 5
... this paper, we present a real-world setup for studies on how humans and intelligent robotic agents can learn and adapt together for the completion of a non-trivial collaborative motor task. We have designed a human-agent collaborative maze game, see Figure 1, where a tray needs to be tilted to navigate a ball to a goal. The human controls one axis of tilt, and the agent controls the other. ...
Context 6
... 50cm × 50cm square tray is built out of cardboard material, and attached to the UR10 end-effector, through a 3D printed mechanical interface. The tray has barrier walls on all four sides to keep the ball from falling off as well as two obstacle walls, positioned diagonally, with a 9cm opening in the centre (refer to Figure 1 and Figure 2). A 5cm-diameter hole is cut near one of the board's corners, representing the goal for a rolling ball to fall into. ...
Context 7
... game, i.e. the task of rolling the ball from a given start point on the tray, to the goal, is solved purely by rotating the tray around its x-y axes (two orthogonal axes on the tray plane, with the centre of the square tray as the origin -see Figure 2); no rotation around the z-axis, nor translations along any axes is allowed. The human player's commands are sent via a smaller tray that they hold and rotate (Figure 1 and 2). The human tray's orientation is tracked with three optical markers placed on top of it, through a motion capture system consisting of Optitrack Flex 13 cameras (NaturalPoint, Inc. ...
Context 8
... OptiTrack, Corvallis, Oregon, USA). The position of the ball on the tray is similarly tracked via optical markers placed inside it (Figure 1 and 2). ...

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