Organizational Structure Bogor100 

Organizational Structure Bogor100 

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Bogor Botanical Gardens (BBGs) is one of the Indonesian Heritage is currently being sought to be recognized as a World Heritage which has survived for hundreds of years in an urban environment. Strategic function of BBGs require community attention in order to manifest a sustainable BBGs. However, the facts show that the shade of the trees began to...

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... In this context, botanical gardens play a very important role in urban sustainability: adding to botanical knowledge, they also store years of practice in horticulture and arboriculture, which is extremely useful to improve urban green spaces in fields such as tree selection and planting, urban forest management plans and restoration [4]. Furthermore, this kind of knowledge can help in the implementation of sustainable environmental management practices, urban biodiversity [44], and the maintenance of urban trees [45], as well as to promote ecosystem services, preserving and valuing biodiversity [46]. ...
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Botanical gardens have long contributed to plant science and have played a leading role in ex situ conservation, namely of threatened tree species. Focusing on the three botanical gardens of Lisbon (i.e., Botanical Garden of Ajuda—JBA, Lisbon Botanical Garden—JBL, and Tropical Botanical Garden—JBT), this study aims to reveal their natural heritage and to understand the historical motivations for their creation. Our results showed that these gardens contain a total of 2551 tree specimens, corresponding to 462 taxa, within 80 plant families. Of these, 85 taxa are found in the three gardens, and more than half of the taxa are hosted in JBL (334 taxa), whereas 230 and 201 taxa were recorded in JBT and JBA, respectively. The motivations for the creation of each garden are reflected in the different geographic origins of the trees they host in their living collections. The Palearctic species are dominant in JBA and JBL, and Tropical trees prevail in JBT. With more than 250 years of history, these gardens hold an invaluable natural and historical heritage, with their living collections providing valuable sources of information for the conservation of threatened plant species, at local and global scales.
... Uma das principais referências em placemaking é a organização norte americana PPS -Project for Public Spaces (https://www.pps.org/). 3 Conforme princípios gerais enunciados, por exemplo, em: Child Friendly Cities (UNICEF); Global Age-Friendly Cities: A Guide (WHO: 2007); Learning about culture and heritage in age-friendly cities (Centre for Ageing Better, 2019); Cities for People (McConnell Foundation); CITIES4PE0PLE (EU-H2020 Project); Climate-resilient, Climate-friendly World Heritage Cities(Bigio, et al., 2014); Conservation of World Heritage Botanical Garden in an Environmentally Friendly City(Hotimah, et al., 2015); The Design for a Welcoming City: Urban Space and Visitor Flow(Bollati & Collina, 2020). 4 Sendo o ato de criar bens comuns constituído pelas práticas sociais(Morea, 2020), é pertinente a sugestão de Sennet (2018: 286) de que, hoje em dia, 'comum' referir-se à "obtenção de benefícios mútuos". ...
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Este ensaio aborda a (re)invenção do espaço urbano a partir de lógicas cocriativas e, em específico, contempla o recurso feito a matéria azulejar no âmbito deste intuito. Por um lado, tendo por referência o Projeto Europeu C3Places, discute o potencial contributo da cocriação enquanto modus operandi do produzir espaço público urbano. Por outro lado, a partir de uma perspetiva exploratória, salienta determinados aspetos observados no decorrer de mapeamento de experiências cocriativas-em Portugal e no Brasil-que, em comum, recorrem ao azulejo na (re)invenção do espaço público. A reflexão destaca o potencial das iniciativas cocriativas no incrementar de sensibilidades coletivas com o património e o ambiente urbano. Observando que as mesmas não advêm de grandes ações, mas naquelas de menor âmbito, localizadas e de cunho colaborativo. O uso feito da matéria azulejar para a dinamização de ações coletivas e colaborativas é salientado. O que permite observar que, por um lado, a partir de uma lógica de continuidade-renovação, o recurso ao azulejo, viabiliza a invenção de património. Por outro lado, a aplicação de azulejo em espaço público protagoniza uma maior atenção coletiva com o ambiente urbano. A cocriação transformativa do espaço infere uma ligação à esfera pública, o que colabora para refletir sobre o papel que pode ter no incremento de práticas sociais mais envolvidas com os lugares urbanos e sensíveis à memória, ao património e ao ambiente. Palavras-chave: cocriação, espaço público, placemaking, azulejo, portador de memória, consciência ambiental e patrimonial.
... The idea of a deeper and more meaningful connection between tourists and locals at a destination place, through longer stays and a more relaxed appreciation of locality leading to a more fulfilling and memorable vacation experience, is the purpose of slow tourism, especially as it relates to environment and heritage sites [22]. This is especially so given the fact that heritage is something that should be prolonged from generation to generation, because generally, it has a value that should be maintained or preserved through its presence [23]. ...
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Changes in tourists’ behavior in recent times have been considered a driving force for emphasizing the importance of unpopular tourism destinations as one of the key potentials in the tourism industry in any nation. On the road to reviving unpopular tourism destinations, this study aims to identify the potential tourism aspect and development of the Ngawen Temple in Indonesia. This research applies the placemaking approach as the main strategy for resurrecting Ngawen Temple. By using visitor surveys, visitor flows, and community surveys, this research obtains a clearer assessment for determining the planning development of Ngawen Temple. The research results revealed that unpopular destinations still have the potential to be developed and bring more benefits to the local economy by conducting a comprehensive placemaking approach. Accordingly, possible strategies based on various literature and field observations can provide clues to stakeholders on how to use their tourism assets to improve local communities’ economies. Some of the most frequently proposed strategies are the following: link the unpopular destination with other popular ones through structured tourism trips; design a “tourist trap,” which is a created place to hold tourists longer in a destination using new additional facilities; improve the infrastructure; and establish more creative tourism spaces, such as tourism centers.
... Bogor Botanic Gardens (BBG) is the oldest ex-situ conservation institution in Southeast Asia (Ariati & Widyatmoko, 2019). The garden has more than 15,000 living collections and one of them is Ficus L. (Moraceae) (Hotimah et al., 2015). The genus is mainly distributed in the tropics and 367 species occurring in the Malesia region (Berg & Corner, 2005). ...
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Ficus spp. belongs to the tribe Ficeae in the Moraceae family. Many members of this genus have been collected and grown in Bogor Botanic Gardens. There are 519 living collections of Ficus conserved since 1817, and 13 of them have not been identified until the species level. This research aimed to identify the Ficus sp. originated from Kaur Selatan (Bengkulu) using morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological characterization and herbarium specimen observation have been carried out to identify the Ficus sp. The molecular approach was conducted through DNA barcoding using ITS primer. The molecular identification using ITS sequence showed that Ficus sp. is Ficus crassiramea with 99.87% similarity to the sequence in NCBI. Morphological observation through herbarium specimen showed that there are 9 vegetative characters specific to Ficus crassiramea.
... The area of BBG spans 75.4 hectares. BBG manages one of the most complete germplasm collections in South East Asia [8]. As of December 2018, BBG has a collection of 12,141 plant specimens consisting of 3156 species of plants (not including a collection of orchids). ...
... The increase in the number of visitors has the potential to cause damage to the ecosystems and the environment. This is apparent in the trees that have become less shady and in the fauna population that is declining [8]. In the last 4 years, the number of cars allowed to enter has increased by 48% from 46.7 thousand in 2014 to 89.5 thousand in 2017. ...
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This study aims to estimate the economic benefits of the Bogor Botanical Gardens (BBG) in terms of willingness to pay (WTP) and, using the estimation, to make a scenario of the entrance fee. Data were collected through a survey among 414 local visitors using the travel cost method (TCM) and choice modeling method (CM). The result from the TCM reveals that travel cost, gender, and education significantly affect the number of visits to the BBG. The value of consumer surplus amounts to IDR 582,072 (USD 40.90) and the total value of benefits obtained is IDR 728.8 billion (USD 51.21 million) per year. Meanwhile, the CM result shows that compensating surplus is estimated at IDR 19,704 (USD 1.38) and the total value of benefits is IDR 24.67 billion (USD 1.73 million) per year. The CM shows that the attributes of service cars as well as information and environmental educational tools and infrastructure have positive and significant values to the visitors. Thus, there is a potential to increase the entrance fee for tourists to become IDR 20,629 (USD 1.45) per visit. Through the increase in entrance fee, the BBG could generate a potential revenue of IDR 25.83 billion (USD 1.81 million) per year, which can improve the number of plant species, information and environmental educational tools and infrastructures, and service cars inside the BBG.
... Not only analyzing species diversity (Cheryl et al., 2018), assessing the heritage value of scenic, natural and cultural (Carolina et al., 2018), it focused on architectural heritage, ancient tree heritage, rock heritage, water heritage and furnishing heritage, pursued improvement of heritage management in accordance with monitoring and early-warning results obtained. The research revealed that active participant (Hotimah et al., 2015), especially monitoring heritage becomes absolutely necessary to preserve garden heritage ontologies. Different from regarding BIM as a resource in heritage management (Godinho et al., 2019), this work applied Matlab software and implement more matrix calculation to achieve a manageable model as a useful decision support tool within the heritage management framework. ...
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Taking garden heritage ontologies as the object, this paper explores monitoring and early-warning methods of heritage based on fuzzy cluster analysis. A monitoring and early-warning system for garden heritage ontologies is designed and consists of monitoring indexes, a monitoring program, monitoring data collection, application of an early-warning grading evaluation model and conclusion of early-warning grading. Taking the Suzhou classical garden heritage as an example, it can be concluded that the systematic method can integrate various qualitative and quantitative index values and collectively reflect the overall state of garden heritage ontologies as well as match a heritage monitoring ontology with an early warning grade by calculating the data similarity matrix, membership matrix, fuzzy similarity matrix, fuzzy equivalent matrix and cut matrix. Five kinds of heritage ontologies with a total of twenty-seven heritage monitoring indicators are applied in the model and then be matched with MATLAB software to obtain accurate early-warning results. When types of heritage ontology need to be expanded, the heritage is further refined, or the heritage is more comprehensive, this method is applicable.
... Bogor Botanical Gardens (BBGs) is one of the Indonesian Heritage is currently being sought to be recognized as a World Heritage which has survived for hundreds of years in an urban environment. Strategic function of BBGs require community attention in order to manifest a sustainable BBGs [1]. ...
... The presented study is about tourism sustainability in the Bogor Botanical Gardens (hereafter BBG). The BBG is not only the most prominent in Indonesia or SE Asia, but represents one of the world's outstanding gardens and features a huge plant collection of over 17,000 species representing tropical trees, palm trees, orchids, etc. (Santosa et al., 2014;Gunawan and Pratiwi, 2015); the BBG also manages one of the most complete collections of germplasm in SE Asia (Hotimah et al., 2015). At the same time, the BBG offers an excellent example of a botanical garden that became an important urban green area: ...
... • the BBG represents an urban forest of 87 ha that survived for centuries in the city (Hotimah et al., 2015); ...
... Also, recently an old lychee tree of the garden fell down after heavy rains, this time no casualties (The Jakarta Post, 2017 October 4). There are other negative trends too, which can be attributed to the rapid development of the City of Bogor (Hotimah et al., 2015): the number of bird species decreased from 85 in 2002 to 35 in 2007, bat abundance decreased noticeably, and the shade cast by trees became less; there are too many cars allowed to circulate within the garden. These issues should be addressed urgently and most probably will need active participation between workers and the communities surrounding the BBG. ...
... Bogor Municipality is located approximately 60 km south of Indonesian capital city, Jakarta [10]. ...
... Step 7. Generate weights for each spatial layer of criteria being involved to form suitability map for urban park, by using Equation (10): (10) Step 8. Normalize each map layer weight using Equation (11): (11) where ͠ wi is weight of i-th map layer and ̃ is un-normalized weight of i-th map layer. ...
Conference Paper
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This article delivers result of urban park feasible areas and locations in Bogor Municipality. Six criteria raster maps namely, urban park policy demand, accessibility, population density, distance to school, distance to water body, and distance to electric power line altogether were aggregated using integrated spatial fuzzy DEMATEL (Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory) and different experts' importance weights. Urban park suitable locations were then superimposed on non-urban area of existing land use map to provide feasible locations. By selecting two classes of urban park suitability, high and very high, the feasible urban park areas and locations were compared. The combined group of experts provide the highest suitable area (19.26 sq km) while government experts and combined all weights provide the most similar areas and locations.
... A total number of 217 species belonging to 72 families were reported from the gardens of Vadodara city (Table 1). Bogor botanical garden has been home to various species, 1349 rare plants, 255 trees over a century old, 9000 species of orchids, 216 species of ants, 96 species of butterflies, 35 species of birds [22]. Among all the 72 families recorded, Arecaceae was found to be the most abundant with representation of 14 species followed by Caesalpiniaceae family (13 species), Apocynaceae (12 species) and Euphorbiaceae (11 species) ( Table 2). ...
Article
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Garden biodiversity is an integral part of the urban ecosystem and play an important role in improving green infrastructure and aid in climate change adaptations. Little research is available on the floral diversity of the parks and gardens. The present study is an attempt to document the floral diversity of 77 gardens in Vadodara city and elucidate trends based on the size of the gardens. Study indicated presence of 217 species belonging to 72 families from the gardens of Vadodara city. The floristic data revealed that around 53% of the species represented indigenous species and 47% belonged to exotic species. Paper concluded that diversity is more in the small gardens as compared to large sized garden, where plantation of few species in undertaken. Species suitable to the semi-arid climate with low water requirement dominated the gardens indicative of better management practices and adapt to climate change.