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Obtained Likability Means Sociability 

Obtained Likability Means Sociability 

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Analyzed the social perception process to determine whether selectivity of available stimuli is based on the informativeness of person attributes, the properties of which are the evaluative extremity (distance from the scale midpoint) and the evaluative valence (positive or negative). In a preliminary scaling study and a main weighting study, 126 u...

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... < .001. Obtained means are presented in Table 6. The planned contrasts testing each of the four models were practicaly identical, since the scale values of the components were the major determinants of the main effects and they remained constant across the different models. ...

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