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Numbers of Pacific Islands and Asian Students Who Accessed/Did Not Access Academic Advising Services

Numbers of Pacific Islands and Asian Students Who Accessed/Did Not Access Academic Advising Services

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In New Zealand, there is growing evidence to suggest an academic achievement disparity between Pacific Islands and Asian university students. The present study investigated an aspect of this disparity and considered students' intentions to seek academic support services and their actual uptake of those services. One hundred and fifty two tertiary s...

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... indicates that the difference in academic performance evidenced by the two ethnic groups was more pronounced among older students. Table 1 shows, according to ethnic affiliation, the comparative numbers of participants who accessed or did not access academic advising services. A chi-square analysis revealed no significant difference between the Pacific Islands and Asian student groups in their actual access of the services,/(I, A'= 152) = .01, ...

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