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Numbers of (A) #DHPSP tweets, (B) new DHPSP Twitter followers, (C) DHPSP Twitter profile visits, and (D) DHPSP website visits for the period August 2020-January 2021. The indicated parameters were analyzed for the period 01.08.2020-31.01.2021 with Symplur Signals (A), Twitter Analytics (B, C), or inbuilt website analytics (D).

Numbers of (A) #DHPSP tweets, (B) new DHPSP Twitter followers, (C) DHPSP Twitter profile visits, and (D) DHPSP website visits for the period August 2020-January 2021. The indicated parameters were analyzed for the period 01.08.2020-31.01.2021 with Symplur Signals (A), Twitter Analytics (B, C), or inbuilt website analytics (D).

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Article
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The open innovation hub Digital Health and Patient Safety Platform (DHPSP) was recently established with the purpose to invigorate collaborative scientific research and the development of new digital products and personalized solutions aiming to improve human health and patient safety. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a Twitter-base...

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... also aimed to obtain long-term information (Fig. 4) for the hashtag use and visibility parameters of the DHPSP Twitter account (https://twitter.com/DHPSP) and website (https://digitalpatientsafety.com/) for a total of six months, including the two months in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign ...
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... in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign (August and September 2020), and the two months following the campaign (December 2020 and January 2021). A very low rate of #DHPSP hashtag was detected in the two months preceding the visibility promotion campaign (Fig. 4A). Similar low usage has also been observed in the first several days of the campaign (Fig. 1). As expected, the execution of the campaign resulted in a substantial increase in the number of #DHPSP tweets in October and especially in November, and then in the following two months there was some decrease of approximately one quarter to ...
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... Conventional use on Twitter (Fig. 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Fig. 4C), and DHPSP website visits (Fig. 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). ...
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... Conventional use on Twitter (Fig. 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Fig. 4C), and DHPSP website visits (Fig. 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) ...
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... Conventional use on Twitter (Fig. 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Fig. 4C), and DHPSP website visits (Fig. 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign ...
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... also aimed to obtain long-term information (Figure 4) for the hashtag use and visibility parameters of the DHPSP Twitter account (https://twitter.com/DHPSP) and website (https://digitalpatientsafety.com/) for a total of six months, including the two months in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign (August and September 2020), and the two months following the campaign (December 2020 and January 2021). ...
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... website (https://digitalpatientsafety.com/) for a total of six months, including the two months in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign (August and September 2020), and the two months following the campaign (December 2020 and January 2021). A very low rate of #DHPSP hashtag was detected in the two months preceding the visibility promotion campaign (Figure 4A). Similar low usage has also been observed in the first several days of the campaign (Figure 1). ...
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... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...
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... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...
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... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...
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... also aimed to obtain long-term information (Figure 4) for the hashtag use and visibility parameters of the DHPSP Twitter account (https://twitter.com/DHPSP) and website (https://digitalpatientsafety.com/) for a total of six months, including the two months in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign (August and September 2020), and the two months following the campaign (December 2020 and January 2021). ...
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... website (https://digitalpatientsafety.com/) for a total of six months, including the two months in which the hashtag visibility promotion campaign was executed (October and November 2020), the two months preceding the campaign (August and September 2020), and the two months following the campaign (December 2020 and January 2021). A very low rate of #DHPSP hashtag was detected in the two months preceding the visibility promotion campaign (Figure 4A). Similar low usage has also been observed in the first several days of the campaign (Figure 1). ...
Context 13
... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...
Context 14
... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...
Context 15
... although there was some decrease in the use of the hashtag after the end of the campaign, its application remained greatly increased compared to the low level seen in August-September 2020. Similarly, the numbers of new DHPSP Twitter followers (Figure 4B), DHPSP Twitter profile visits (Figure 4C), and DHPSP website visits ( Figure 4D) were highest during the execution of the campaign (October and November 2020) and decreased to some extent in the following two months (December 2020 and January 2021) while remaining higher than the period before the campaign (August and September 2020). Interestingly, increased visibility (reach) for the period of the campaign (October and November 2020) was also evident for the DHPSP Facebook account (Figure 5). ...

Citations

... To disseminate the knowledge to a wider audience, social media tools are of immense significance. The utilization of hashtags like #INPST, #NPMND and #DHPSP on Twitter or other social media resulted in the greater circulation of the articles and is being considered as digital health promotion (Kletecka-Pulker et al., 2021;Singla, 2021). We strongly encourage the authors and readers to use these hashtags to further promote their scientific literature. ...
... In Europe [51], China [52], and India [53], similar trends were observed. The potential use of nutraceuticals and supplements during the pandemic was a topic of enthusiastic debate on social media [54] and in the literature [13,55,56]. In this context, intense debate on the efficacy and safety of nutraceuticals for the prevention and/or treatment of COVID-19 is ongoing, and sales of nutraceuticals are expected to remain high in the first half of 2021, albeit at much lower level than the sales achieved at the beginning of the pandemic [57]. ...
Article
The nutraceutical market is currently a high-impact multi-billion-dollar industry, and it is anticipated to grow rapidly over the next decade. Nutraceuticals comprise diverse food-derived product categories that have become widespread due to increased consumer awareness of potential health benefits and the need for improved wellness. This targeted review is designed to identify the current global trends, market opportunities, and regulations that drive the nutraceutical industry. Safety and efficacy concerns are also explored with a view to highlighting areas that necessitate further research and oversight. Key drivers of the nutraceutical market include aging populations, consumer awareness, consumer lifestyle, increasing cost of healthcare, and marketing channels. Although some nutraceuticals hold promising preventive and therapeutic opportunities, there is a lack of a universal definition and regulatory framework among countries. Moreover, there is a lack of adequate evidence for their efficacy, safety, and effectiveness, which was even further highlighted during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Future prospective epidemiological studies can delineate the health impact of nutraceuticals and help set the scientific basis and rationale foundation for clinical trials, reducing the time and cost of trials themselves. Together, an understanding of the key drivers of the nutraceutical market alongside a consistent and well-defined regulatory framework will provide further opportunities for growth, expansion, and segmentation of nutraceuticals applications.
... Simultaneously, established phytocompounds based anticancer drugs such as cabazitaxel (Jevtana R ) can benefit from nanoparticle drug design in future clinical studies. Digital health applications can improve retrospective and prospective research to assess natural compound-based nanoparticles more comprehensively (Kletecka-Pulker et al., 2021). Research in the field can also be enriched by the compassionate administration of such nanomedicines in patients with advanced disease under designated regulatory frameworks. ...
Article
Full-text available
Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality around the world. The progression of advanced prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) plays a major role in disease-associated morbidity and mortality, posing a significant therapeutic challenge. Resistance has been associated with the activation of androgen receptors via several mechanisms, including alternative dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthetic pathways, other androgen receptor activator molecules, oncogenes, and carcinogenic signaling pathways. Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role not only in the cancer progression but also in the drug resistance. Numerous natural products have shown major potential against particular or multiple resistance pathways as shown by in vitro and in vivo studies. However, their efficacy in clinical trials has been undermined by their unfavorable pharmacological properties (hydrophobic molecules, instability, low pharmacokinetic profile, poor water solubility, and high excretion rate). Nanoparticle formulations can provide a way out of the stalemate, employing targeted drug delivery, improved pharmacokinetic drug profile, and transportation of diagnostic and therapeutic agents via otherwise impermeable biological barriers. This review compiles the available evidence regarding the use of natural products for the management of CRPC with a focus on nanoparticle formulations. PubMed and Google Scholar search engines were used for preclinical studies, while ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed were searched for clinical studies. The results of our study suggest the efficacy of natural compounds such as curcumin, resveratrol, apigenin, quercetin, fisetin, luteolin, kaempferol, genistein, berberine, ursolic acid, eugenol, gingerol, and ellagic acid against several mechanisms leading to castration resistance in preclinical studies, but fail to set the disease under Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology | www.frontiersin.org 1 November 2021 | Volume 9 | Article 745177 Singla et al. Natural Products Against CRPC control in clinical studies. Nanoparticle formulations of curcumin and quercetin seem to increase their potential in clinical settings. Using nanoparticles based on betulinic acid, capsaicin, sintokamide A, niphatenones A and B, as well as atraric acid seems promising but needs to be verified with preclinical and clinical studies.
... Simultaneously, established phytocompounds based anticancer drugs such as cabazitaxel (Jevtana R ) can benefit from nanoparticle drug design in future clinical studies. Digital health applications can improve retrospective and prospective research to assess natural compound-based nanoparticles more comprehensively (Kletecka-Pulker et al., 2021). Research in the field can also be enriched by the compassionate administration of such nanomedicines in patients with advanced disease under designated regulatory frameworks. ...
Article
Full-text available
Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality around the world. The progression of advanced prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) plays a major role in disease-associated morbidity and mortality, posing a significant therapeutic challenge. Resistance has been associated with the activation of androgen receptors via several mechanisms, including alternative dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthetic pathways, other androgen receptor activator molecules, oncogenes, and carcinogenic signaling pathways. Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role not only in the cancer progression but also in the drug resistance. Numerous natural products have shown major potential against particular or multiple resistance pathways as shown by in vitro and in vivo studies. However, their efficacy in clinical trials has been undermined by their unfavorable pharmacological properties (hydrophobic molecules, instability, low pharmacokinetic profile, poor water solubility, and high excretion rate). Nanoparticle formulations can provide a way out of the stalemate, employing targeted drug delivery, improved pharmacokinetic drug profile, and transportation of diagnostic and therapeutic agents via otherwise impermeable biological barriers. This review compiles the available evidence regarding the use of natural products for the management of CRPC with a focus on nanoparticle formulations. PubMed and Google Scholar search engines were used for preclinical studies, while ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed were searched for clinical studies. The results of our study suggest the efficacy of natural compounds such as curcumin, resveratrol, apigenin, quercetin, fisetin, luteolin, kaempferol, genistein, berberine, ursolic acid, eugenol, gingerol, and ellagic acid against several mechanisms leading to castration resistance in preclinical studies, but fail to set the disease under control in clinical studies. Nanoparticle formulations of curcumin and quercetin seem to increase their potential in clinical settings. Using nanoparticles based on betulinic acid, capsaicin, sintokamide A, niphatenones A and B, as well as atraric acid seems promising but needs to be verified with preclinical and clinical studies.
... Surprisingly, data from the University of Oxford's Evidence-Based Medicine Data Lab's COVID-19 TrialsTracker indicates that traditional medicines are the most common intervention registered for clinical trials against COVID-19, with vitamin D, vitamin C, and probiotics also present on the list amongst the many pharmacological interventions under investigation [1,13,14]. Of all the supplements of interest, vitamin D has caught the attention of scientists and many individuals on social media [15]. This occurred in part because vitamin D deficiency was widely reported amongst COVID-19, and it was associated with COVID-19 incidence. ...
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Drawing from recent advances in the field of health sociology, our study highlights topics and framings of health technologies (HT) diffused online by more than 4,000 identified actors actively involved in HT discussions on Twitter. Adopting an exploratory approach, we distinguish between health institutions, specialists, and advocates, and we assess key topics and framings promoted online by these actors. First, we show that the geographical distribution of important actors correlates with the citizens’ reliance on social media to seek health information. Then, relying on ‘state-of-the-art’ methods in textual analysis, we identify prevalent online topics and show that the United States focuses more on risk management and private funding, whereas Europe focuses more on health literacy, practitioners, and start-ups. Furthermore, institutions focus more on indirect, global, and strategic problematics, whereas specialists are more concerned with direct and concrete problems. We also use creative visualisations displaying semantic relationships along important dimensions of HT, notably in terms of concerns related to technological priorities, professional skills, and privacy issues, as well as a possible shift in concerns related to privacy issues before and after the COVID pandemic. We conclude by discussing future research paths, particularly by giving insights into what are potential further survey interests.