Numbers and percentages of participants in each longitudinal profile of substance use.

Numbers and percentages of participants in each longitudinal profile of substance use.

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Background/Objective Substance use is one of the main risks for adolescent health. Many research projects have studied longitudinal patterns of use and risk/protective factors, but the number of studies focused on within-individual stability and change is low. The objective of this study was to discover specific longitudinal profiles of drug use an...

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... within-person profiles of substance use were obtained by combining wave 1 and wave 2 profiles for each participant. Numbers of participants and percentages of the sample belonging to each profile are shown in Table 2. The most prevalent profile was non-users (65.7%), followed by stable occasional users (13.2%). ...

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... Las competencias socioemocionales del alumnado se relacionan con un mayor desarrollo de sus competencias académicas, como la competencia en comunicación lingüística (Llorent, González-Gómez et al., 2020). Además, las competencias socioemocionales protegen a los adolescentes ante conductas antisociales, en el contexto offline y online, tales como consumo de sustancias (Rodríguez-Ruiz et al., 2021), bullying (Coelho y Marchante, 2021;Zych, Beltrán-Catalán et al., 2018), cyberbullying (Eden et al., 2016;Marín-López et al., 2020) y comportamientos violentos en general (Espejo-Siles et al., 2020;Nasaescu et al., 2021). ...
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INTRODUCCIÓN: Las competencias socioemocionales y morales son el conjunto de conocimientos, habilidades y actitudes que permite desarrollar relaciones prosociales, y comprender y gestionar las emociones propias y de los demás en contextos diversos. Se entiende que las competencias socioemocionales y morales son fundamentales para la convivencia adecuada en los centros escolares. Se han implementado intervenciones escolares para desarrollar dichas competencias en los estudiantes. Estas intervenciones son más efectivas si el profesorado es competente socioemocional y moralmente. Pero no se han encontrado estudios que analicen las competencias socioemocionales y morales del profesorado de enseñanzas no universitarias. Esta investigación persigue estudiar el nivel de competencias socioemocionales y morales del profesorado no universitario. MÉTODO: Se ha desarrollado un estudio cuantitativo, descriptivo, transversal ex-post-facto, con 301 docentes de Educación Infantil a Educación Secundaria (70.80% mujeres, 27.90% hombres; Medad = 38.33, DT = 11.10). La investigación se ha realizado mediante encuesta (características sociolaborales y dos escalas, una sobre competencias socioemocionales y otra sobre emociones morales), con muestreo por conveniencia y accesibilidad. RESULTADOS: El profesorado presenta un nivel alto de competencias socioemocionales y morales. Las mujeres y quienes presentan mucha experiencia con alumnado de diferente origen étnico-cultural, con diferentes orientaciones sexuales y con discapacidad puntúan significativamente más alto en competencias socioemocionales y morales que los hombres y que quienes presentan poca o ninguna experiencia en los tres ámbitos mencionados. DISCUSIÓN: Los hallazgos de este estudio evidencian que el profesorado de Educación Infantil a Educación Secundaria se autopercibe competente a nivel socioemocional y moral. Este estudio señala además qué áreas pueden ser reforzadas en la formación inicial docente para que el profesorado sea competente socioemocional y moralmente, con implicaciones en la formación de profesionales de excelencia y, por ende, en el logro de una educación de calidad que responda a las características de todo el alumnado.
... Even though genetic influences are important, different meta-analyses have shown that environmental factors are crucial for the development of antisocial behavior (Byrd & Manuck, 2014;van Hazebroek et al., 2019). For instance, a meta-analysis published by Rhee and Waldman (2002) found that environmental shared and nonshared influences accounted for 59% of the variability in antisocial behavior. Burt (2009), in another meta-analysis, found that environmental influences were more important for rule-breaking than for aggressive behaviors. ...
... Validation in different cultures and languages is essential for developing cross-national studies. The environment is an important factor for antisocial behavior, as stated by a previous meta-analysis (Rhee & Waldman, 2002). Regarding the SRA (Loeber et al., 1989), this questionnaire has been used in the Pittsburgh Youth Study, one of the most prominent longitudinal studies in criminology (Loeber et al., 2008). ...
... Regarding the SRA (Loeber et al., 1989), this questionnaire has been used in the Pittsburgh Youth Study, one of the most prominent longitudinal studies in criminology (Loeber et al., 2008). Furthermore, it has been used in recent studies with young people (Ahonen et al., 2021;Nasaescu et al., 2021;Rodríguez-Ruiz et al., 2021). Nevertheless, its psychometric properties in Spain still need to be tested. ...
Article
Antisocial behavior is a worldwide problem that negatively affects individuals and societies, and it is influenced by contextual factors. The study of how antisocial behavior changes through time frames and among countries provides information of the extent to which the environment influences this problem, which could help to develop more accurate prevention programs. Cross-national studies require instruments with good psychometric properties, validated in different cultures and languages. Thus, the aim of this study was to validate the Spanish version of the Self-Reported Antisocial Behavior Questionnaire, and to analyze whether there are differences in reported antisocial behavior between pre-adolescents in Pittsburgh, North America (1988) and Cordoba, Spain (2017). The sample included 1,483 Cordoba students of whom 203 were comparable in age to 868 Pittsburgh boys. Results showed that the Spanish version of the Self-Reported Antisocial Behavior Questionnaire had excellent psychometric properties, and that there were some similarities and differences in antisocial behaviors reported by the samples from Pittsburgh and Cordoba. Results are discussed according to time frames and environmental influences of the samples. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.
... Scientific research shows that substance use in adolescence increased the likelihood of early pregnancy, drug dependence, and criminal involvement (Odgers et al., 2008), as well as problematic substance use, physical aggression, and poorer wellbeing in adulthood (Shanahan et al., 2021). Individual characteristics such as high self-management or self-control have been identified as protective factors against adolescent substance use (Leinberg & Lehmann, 2020;Rodríguez-Ruiz et al., 2021). Similarly, contextual factors such as positive parenting may also protect against adolescent substance use (Trucco, 2020). ...
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This study examined longitudinal links between several dimensions of parent–child relationship and adolescent substance use, and tested the role of self-control in mediating these. Data came from the Zurich Project on the Social Development from Childhood to Adulthood. Validated questionnaires were used to measure parent–child domains at age 11, self-control at age 13, and substance use at ages 13, 15, 17, and 20. Low positive parenting and parental supervision, as well as aversive parenting, correlated with substance use. Linear regression model revealed that aversive parenting, low child disclosure, low positive parenting, and low parental involvement at age 11 predicted substance use at different stages of adolescence. These associations were mediated by low self-control at age 13. Involving parents and increasing their knowledge about desirable parental practices and ways to help their children to develop adequate self-control could be an effective element in substance use prevention strategies.
... Moreover, families should supervise their adolescent children, so they are not involved in substance use, especially during the pandemic. Although it is not allowed to sell alcohol and tobacco to minors in Spain, substance use in adolescents is common (Rodríguez-Ruiz et al., 2021). Many adolescents reported noncompliance with COVID-19 measures. ...
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Prevalence rates of compliance with anti-COVID measures have been widely studied, but little is known about this issue in early adolescence. Moreover, the relation between substance use and compliance with anti-COVID regulations is still unexplored. Thus, this study aimed to determine the level of compliance with anti-COVID measures by adolescents and the link between substance use and compliance with anti-COVID regulations. This was a cross-sectional study including 909 participants ( M age = 12.57; SD = 0.81). The most complied measure was mask-wearing, followed by avoiding hug/kiss friends and, finally, social distancing. All substance use negatively correlated with compliance with measures. However, strong alcohol and tobacco were the only substances significantly related to less compliance of anti-COVID measures after controlling for covariates. These results provide evidence about the relation between substance use and compliance with anti-COVID measures. Strategies addressed to decrease substance use could be effective to reduce behaviours associated with coronavirus transmission.
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Background: Adolescent substance use has been widely related to different individual, school, family and community factors. Yet, the number of studies with all these variables together in a model from an ecological perspective is still low, and they rarely used a longitudinal design. The aim of this study was to explore, from an ecological perspective, the prospective impact of different individual, school, family and neighbourhood factors on adolescent substance use. Methods: This was a longitudinal study with a one-year follow up. There were 881 participants (Mage = 12.57; 48.1% females) at wave 1, of which 686 (Mage = 13.51; 51.8% females) were followed-up at wave 2. Validated questionnaires were used for data collection. Results: Regression analyses showed that higher substance use was predicted by high family socio-economic status cross-sectionally and longitudinally, and it was related to low neighbourhood socio-economic status cross-sectionally only. Participants who disliked school and had a poor academic performance were more likely to use substances, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Conclusions: The inclusion of families in substance use prevention programmes could be a key component in these interventions. Moreover, promotion of a positive school climate could protect adolescents from using substances.