Number of branches (a) and % of branches (b) in different portions of the central leader of Arbequina micropropagated trees with two leaves per node (2 LN) and three leaves per node (3 LN), compared with those from cuttings. Measurements were taken one year after planting in the field. Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between tested plant types (Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc tests, p ≤ 0.05).

Number of branches (a) and % of branches (b) in different portions of the central leader of Arbequina micropropagated trees with two leaves per node (2 LN) and three leaves per node (3 LN), compared with those from cuttings. Measurements were taken one year after planting in the field. Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between tested plant types (Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc tests, p ≤ 0.05).

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Olive micropropagation is nowadays possible but knowing if it induces juvenile traits and how juvenility, vigor and fruit productivity are affected is pivotal. Three trials were carried out during micropropagation and afterwards in the field. Three varieties were characterized during multiplication in vitro, after several subcultures. ‘Arbequina’ r...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... higher number of primary branches was recorded for the micropropagated trees than those produced by cuttings (Figure 9a). A tendency for a higher number of branches per portion was observed in young trees with three leaves per node when micropropagated trees were compared to those obtained through cutting; however, these differences were seen only in the median portion of the central leader. ...
Context 2
... tendency for a higher number of branches per portion was observed in young trees with three leaves per node when micropropagated trees were compared to those obtained through cutting; however, these differences were seen only in the median portion of the central leader. The distribution of the branches along the main axis was more uniform in the micropropagated trees in comparison with those from cutting, which had mostly higher percentage of branches in the median portion (Figure 9b). In addition to this, the branches of the micropropagated trees had a greater number of second-order ramifications, especially in the basal portion (data not shown). ...

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