Table 2 - uploaded by Paweł Krystian Bereś
Content may be subject to copyright.
Number of Agrotinae moths caught in pheromone traps in Terliczka, Nienadówka and Głuchów in the years 2008–2010 

Number of Agrotinae moths caught in pheromone traps in Terliczka, Nienadówka and Głuchów in the years 2008–2010 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
In years 2004–2010, in the monitored maize plantations the following species of cutworms were caught to pheromone traps: turnip moth (Agrotis segetum Schiff.), heart and dart (Agrotis exclamationis L.), spotted cutworm (Amathes c-nigrum L.) and black cutworm (Agrotis ypsilon Rott.). A species dominating in the catches was A. segetum. The harmfulnes...

Citations

... Several species have dominated over the years: Agrotis segetum, A. exclamationis, A. ipsilon, Noctua pronuba, and Xestia (Megasema) c-nigrum (Ruszkowski 1933(Ruszkowski , 1937Ruszkowski et al. 1935;Ogijewicz 1938;Węgorek 1966;Lipa 1977;Napiórkowska-Kowalik 1996;Walczak & Jakubowska 2001;Mrówczyński et al. 2006;Bereś 2011b). The remaining species, although commonly found in vegetable agrocenoses, do not cause such extensive damage (Table 13). ...
Article
Full-text available
There are over 2,240 butterfly species of Lepidoptera belonging to 17 families recorded in Poland. Of those, 63 phytophagous species have been noted in vegetable agrocenoses at a level of pest status. They constitute 18% of all harmful entomofauna found on vegetable crops. The species described in this paper are common on all vegetable crops growing in Poland, and all parts of plants. The most abundant pests found on aerial parts of crops include the silver Y moth ( Autographa gamma ), which causes damage to 20 species of vegetables, and species belonging to the genera Mamestra , Lacanobia and Anarta , which feed on more than 10 vegetable species. Of the polyphagous leaf roller moths (Tortricidae), the most numerous are the species belonging to the genus Cnephasia . Periodically, they pose a significant threat, among others for beetroot, pea, cucumber, and lettuce. The diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella ) and the cabbage butterfly ( Pieris rapae ) are dominant butterfly pests on brassica vegetables. A component of harmful entomofauna on onion crops is leek moth ( Acrolepiopsis assectella ), a species permanently dominant on onion vegetables in Poland since 1930s. The species of the family Depressariidae cause the greatest damage on the generative organs of seed crops, mainly of dill, carrot and parsley. Underground parts of vegetable crops are damaged by cut-worms (Noctuidae), which belong to the group of soil-borne pests. Among more than 60 species belonging to this family, nine cause the greatest damage to vegetable crops. The turnip moth ( Agrotis segetum ), as a dominant species in recent years, accounted for about 80% of cutworms damaging vegetable crops, and prefers onion, leek, carrot, parsley, celery and corn. Although the European corn borer ( Ostrinia nubilalis ) is considered a polyphagous species, it forms the most abundant populations on maize out of all other crops.
... Cutworms are harmful primarily due to their large population size, which is heavily influenced by weather conditions and the extended time of incubation and development of voracious caterpillars. Cold winters, warm and dry springs and summers, and then dry autumns are particularly favorable for cutworms (Walczak and Jakubowska 2001;Bereś 2011). ...
... The most numerous were Agrotis segetum and A. exclamationis. The population size of the individual species of moths from the Noctuinae subfamily could have been significantly affected by crops of other Garnis and Dąbrowski 2008;Bereś 2011;Jakubowska and Ławiński 2011). Moreover, in the authors' study it was found that greater numbers of the Agrotis moths were caught. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this research was to create an advisory system for commodity services and sugar beet growers to support their decisions about the use of chemical control against the cutworms. Consequently, two forecasting models for determining the chemical control time were compared: one based on a signaling method and the other based on average of [effective] temperatures necessary for caterpillars to achieve the desired L2 stage. The date of first flights and the total number of pests on plantations were determined. The usefulness of monitoring cutworm catches was also compared with systematic observations of sugar beet fields at the moment when the mass flight of cutworm moths was identified. The beginning of oviposition, hatching of the first caterpillars and the caterpillars’ growth to 10–12 mm was observed, and optimal date of chemical treatment against cutworms was forecasted. During the study, the time for insecticidal treatments against cutworms was determined by the signaling method between the 29th and the 41st day following the onset of the cutworm moths’ mass flight. The time of treatments was determined phenologically by obtaining the sum of heat which ranged from 300.7 to 696.4 °C with an average of 523.17 °C and the sum of effective temperatures which ranged from 120.2 to 260.5 °C with an average of 180.1 °C.
Chapter
The sugar beet agro-ecosystem has a few key or primary pests that may actually limit production under certain conditions. A couple of these are available all over the world. In addition to the primary pests, there are numerous species that cause periodic losses to sugar beet, while a few species have such a low population rate that no serious damage occurs. Sugar beet crops could be considered a long-term cropping system from the time of planting to harvest. Knowledge of the species complex and their roles in the ecosystem can be essential for deciding whether or not to use pesticides. The indiscriminate use of pesticides may lead to outbreaks of leaf-feeding and sucking pests. There is a need for more emphasis on the augmentation and conservation of natural enemies. Farmers are advised for practicing integrated insect pest management strategies for controlling the insect-pests and their damage and encourage the natural build-up of parasitoids and predators. The chapter provides a comprehensive overview of various insect-pests that affect sugar beet crops, with a focus on Indian conditions.KeywordsInsect-pestIPMSugar beet