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Normalized Pd K-edge XANES spectra collected for UiO-67 functionalized by Pd during activation in He (part a) from RT (black) to 300 C (red), and subsequently collected (11 minutes per spectrum) at 300 C (part b, from bottom to top).

Normalized Pd K-edge XANES spectra collected for UiO-67 functionalized by Pd during activation in He (part a) from RT (black) to 300 C (red), and subsequently collected (11 minutes per spectrum) at 300 C (part b, from bottom to top).

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We report a series of Pd K-edge and Pt L3-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) collected in situ during thermal treatment of functionalized UiO-67-Pd and UiO-67-Pt metal-organic frameworks in inert and reducing atmospheres. We present raw synchrotron data from three subsequent experiments at different beamlines, normalized XAS spectra and k2-weighte...

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Context 1
... K-edge XAS spectra for UiO-67-Pd samples (Figs. 4e5) were collected at BM31 beamline [7] ESRF, using a similar setup as described above for Pt L 3 -edge. The mass of the sample inside the capillaries was around 5 mg. The samples were sieved before loading into the capillaries and the fraction below 100 mm was removed. The total flux of 50 mL/min was applied. Two different gas mixtures ...
Context 2
... collected at BM31 beamline [7] ESRF, using a similar setup as described above for Pt L 3 -edge. The mass of the sample inside the capillaries was around 5 mg. The samples were sieved before loading into the capillaries and the fraction below 100 mm was removed. The total flux of 50 mL/min was applied. Two different gas mixtures were sent: pure He (Figs. 4), 3% H 2 /He (Fig. 5). The samples were first heated stepwise until no spectral changes were observed and were then kept at 300 and 215 C in inert and reducing flux, respectively, and the spectra were measured continuously. The photon energy was scanned from 24.0 to 25.4 keV using Si(111) double crystal monochromator operated in ...

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