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Noise Hotspots: Number of noise-producing human activities over a 40 x 40 km spatial grid 

Noise Hotspots: Number of noise-producing human activities over a 40 x 40 km spatial grid 

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Technical Report
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Identifying areas of high anthropogenic pressure on the marine environment is a key element for an effective environmental management and for mitigating impacts. As underwater noise is considered a major threat for cetaceans, the ACCOBAMS Agreement has undertaken a work aiming at identifying noise hotspots and areas of potential conflicts with ceta...

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... number of noise-producing human activities was computed on a spatial grid (grid size = 40 x 40 km, figure 9). As stated in section 2.6, only activities using impulsive noise sources were addressed in this analysis. Values vary from 0 (no impulsive noise-producing human activity recorded) to 4 (all activities using impulsive noise sources considered in this study were recorded). Areas showing highest values (3 and 4 types of activity) are located in the Italian part of the Adriatic, in the Strait of Sicily, in the French Mediterranean from the Côte d’Azur to the Gulf of Fos, in the Gulf of Valencia, in North-eastern Corsica, the higher Ionian Sea, and the coast of Campania. Finally, we superimposed this last map to the layer of important cetacean habitats as identified and recognised by Parties to ACCOBAMS through Resolution 4.15, adopted in 2010 (figure 10). This result yields important information of areas where potential conflicts between human activities and cetacean conservation might occur, in the framework of noise pollution. Such areas appear to be the Pelagos Sanctuary, the Strait of Sicily, and the area of the northern part of the Hellenic ...
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... number of noise-producing human activities was computed on a spatial grid (grid size = 40 x 40 km, figure 9). As stated in section 2.6, only activities using impulsive noise sources were addressed in this analysis. ...

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... Underwater noise was added to our analysis because increased noise pollution may obscure propeller sounds, affecting sea turtles ability to avoid collisions or cause changes in their behavior (Lavender et al., 2014;Peng et al., 2015). Data on underwater noise sources were extracted from Maglio et al. (2016) including harbors, offshore oil and gas drilling, offshore wind farms, seismic surveys, and military exercises covering the period from 2005 to 2015. The utilized datasets on these five key human pressures do not refer to exactly the same time periods, but these were the best possible datasets that were available within the ten-year period. ...
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