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Near East and Neolithic Europe map. Coloured areas represent different Neolithic cultures, and black solid lines represent the areas where cultural and chronological recomposition occurs, according to Guilaine (2001). The original map was modified to include the Mediterranean/Atlantic transition around the Strait of Gibraltar -dotted line. This last Western recomposition does not correspond to a chronological gap between Iberia Mediterranean/Atlantic façades, as documented in other European areas.

Near East and Neolithic Europe map. Coloured areas represent different Neolithic cultures, and black solid lines represent the areas where cultural and chronological recomposition occurs, according to Guilaine (2001). The original map was modified to include the Mediterranean/Atlantic transition around the Strait of Gibraltar -dotted line. This last Western recomposition does not correspond to a chronological gap between Iberia Mediterranean/Atlantic façades, as documented in other European areas.

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Western Iberia Early Neolithic has been described as an ultimate and very altered form of the Mediterranean Neolithisation process. Despite its Atlantic position, this territory – corresponding mainly to Central/Southern Portugal – is, in its physical and cultural geography, a Mediterranean landscape deeply connected to a historical process arrivin...

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Context 1
... one of those areas (Figure 1), although some major differences can be detected between them, considering the material culture techno-typological choices underlying pottery and flaked industries. ...
Context 2
... this correlation between material culture, or specific artefacts, and archaeological cultures immediately evoked an old agenda in which groups, or peoples -spread in time and space, along with their objects -were the basic foundations for archaeological discourse, and such a conceptual framework underlies the maps of cultural areas as the one presented in Figure 1. This epistemological background is not an innocent one and was partially rejected after WWII in a process led by Anglophones against culturehistorical archaeology and its major statements -like race and racism, physical and mental rankings among humans -that allowed the emergence of a new and scientific archaeology (Clarke, 1968). ...

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