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Multiple linear regression analysis of the factors that affect quality of life.

Multiple linear regression analysis of the factors that affect quality of life.

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Article
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This study aimed to evaluate the fear of COVID-19, loneliness, resilience, and quality of life levels in older adults in a nursing home during the pandemic, and the effects of these variables and descriptive characteristics on their quality of life. Data were collected using a participant information form, the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), the Bri...

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... factors affecting quality of life (Table 4). ...
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... factors affecting quality of life (Table 4). ...

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... Regarding age, the research highlights that older people suffered the most from negative effects such as fear and loneliness 19,20 . Younger individuals had fewer negative emotions because they saw COVID-19 as a less risky disease for them 21 , although they did report anxiety and depression due to the social restrictions imposed 21 . ...
Article
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The outbreak of COVID-19 forced a dramatic shift in education, from in-person learning to an increased use of distance learning over the past 2 years. Opinions and sentiments regarding this switch from traditional to remote classes can be tracked in real time in microblog messages promptly shared by Twitter users, who constitute a large and ever-increasing number of individuals today. Given this framework, the present study aims to investigate sentiments and topics related to distance learning in Italy from March 2020 to November 2021. A two-step sentiment analysis was performed using the VADER model and the syuzhet package to understand the overall sentiments and emotions. A dynamic latent Dirichlet allocation model (DLDA) was built to identify commonly discussed topics in tweets and their evolution over time. The results show a modest majority of negative opinions, which shifted over time until the trend reversed. Among the eight emotions of the syuzhet package, ‘trust’ was the most positive emotion observed in the tweets, while ‘fear’ and ‘sadness’ were the top negative emotions. Our analysis also identified three topics: (1) requests for support measures for distance learning, (2) concerns about distance learning and its application, and (3) anxiety about the government decrees introducing the red zones and the corresponding restrictions. People’s attitudes changed over time. The concerns about distance learning and its future applications (topic 2) gained importance in the latter stages of 2021, while the first and third topics, which were ranked highly at first, started a steep descent in the last part of the period. The results indicate that even if current distance learning ends, the Italian people are concerned that any new emergency will bring distance learning back into use again.
... Higher mortality rates due to the disease were reported worldwide before the vaccine was made widely available, and older adults living in long-term care facilities (nursing homes or residential care facilities) were even more vulnerable [1]. Several countries imposed restrictions on external visits and internal activities to contain the spread of the disease [2][3][4], which was indeed more dangerous within institutions where highly susceptible people were clustered in one place [1] and where higher mortality rates due to the disease were reported [5]. The lack of activities and family visits affected the older adults living in these institutions worldwide, who were further isolated due to the demands of the restrictive measures, presenting increased depressive symptoms and anxiety, reduced mental acuteness, physical capacity, well-being, and quality of life due to the lack of social connectedness and other factors [6,7]. ...
... QoL is measured based on the individuals' perceptions (a subjective measure of well-being), focusing on their overall satisfaction or dissatisfaction with different aspects of their lives, e.g., physical and mental/emotional well-being, social relationships, and environment [18]. A limited number of studies have assessed the QoL of older adults living in long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemics [5,18] using a pre-post intervention design such as in this study. ...
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Background : The COVID-19 pandemic primarily impacted long-term care facilities by restricting visiting and circulation, affecting the quality of life (QoL) of older adults living in these institutions. Volunteer activities, essential for older adults’ daily life, were also interrupted and potentially negatively impacted the QoL of older adults, volunteers themselves, and also employees in these institutions, although this three-fold effect was not yet investigated. In this context, this study aims to evaluate the impact of the return of volunteer-led activities in a long-term care institution on the QoL of older adult residents, employees, and volunteers. Methods : This study used a pre-test and post-test design within the same group. The first round of data collection was conducted before volunteer-led activities return and the second round after one month of return. The instrument used to assess QoL was the EUROHIS-QoL-8 scale. This study was conducted within a nursing home in São Paulo, Brazil, created in 1937 by members of the Israeli community living in Brazil. Volunteer-led activities were part of residents’ daily life before the COVID-19 pandemic, when these activities were interrupted for about 20 months. A total of 79 individuals participated in both rounds (pre and post), of which: 29 residents, 27 volunteers, and 23 employees of the long-term care institution. Results : Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the analyses indicated improvements after the one month return in different QoL aspects for the three groups. Volunteers improved their personal relationships (Z -2.332, p< .05), residents their overall health (Z -2.409, p< .05) and employees in their overall QoL perception (Z -2.714, p< .05). Influencing factors for residents were the number of activities (3 or more), gender (male), and education (undergraduate/graduate). For employees, those who assumed additional activities due to the volunteer-led activities interruption had a significant impact on their overall QoL. Conclusions : Evidence from this study suggests that volunteers’ return positively impacted different QoL aspects for volunteers, residents, and employees.
... Older people suffer most from the negative effects of COVID-19. Restrictive measures, fear, and loneliness have had negative repercussions on the resilience of people aged 65 and over, thus compromising their physical and psychological wellbeing (Plagg et al., 2020;Set, 2020;Savci et al., 2021). Esposito et al. (2021) underline how young participants due to the social restrictions imposed suffered of anxiety and depression; furthermore, Biviá-Roig et al. (2020) found that pregnant women during lockdowns suffered most from anxiety and depression. ...
Article
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The pandemic nature of COVID-19 has caused major changes in health, economy, and society globally. Albeit to a lesser extent, contingent access to shops and places to socialize the imposition of social distancing and the use of indoor masks is measures still in force today (more than a year after the start of the pandemic), with repercussions on economic, social, and psychological levels. The fear of contagion, in fact, has led us to be increasingly suspicious and to isolate ourselves from the remainder of the community. This has had repercussions on the perception of loneliness, with significant psychological consequences, such as the development of stress, anxiety, and, in extreme cases, depressive symptoms. Starting from these assumptions, this research was developed with the aim of deepening the perceptions that the participants have of their own mental health, loneliness, fear linked to contagion, and attitudes toward imposed social distancing. In particular, we wanted to analyze whether there is a relationship between perceived fear and the perceived level of mental health, loneliness, and attitude toward social distancing. Finally, we wanted to analyze whether there are differences related to gender, age, marital status, current working mode, and educational qualifications. The research, performed after the diffusion of the vaccination in Italy, lasted 14 days. The participants were 500 Italians who voluntarily joined the study and were recruited with random cascade sampling. The research followed a quantitative approach. The analyzed data, from participants residing throughout the national territory, allow us to return the picture of the perceptions that Italians have of the fear of contagion, of their level of mental health, of loneliness and of their attitude toward social distancing. In particular, the data show that fear of COVID-19 is an emotional state experienced by the entire population and that young people have suffered more from loneliness and have been less inclined to accept the imposed social distancing. The data that emerged should make policymakers reflect on the need to find functional strategies to combat COVID-19 or other health emergency crises whose effects do not affect the psychological wellbeing of the population.
... According to the data of Ministry of Health, older adults constitute 11% of the reported patients and 72% of deaths. 9 After the first case was seen in Turkey on March 11, 2020, various measures were taken across the country for all people, but especially for older adults. A partial curfew was introduced for older adults and those with chronic diseases. ...
... There are previous studies conducted before the pandemic regarding health literacy level of older adults, [23][24][25] and several studies related to fear of COVID-19 during the pandemic. 9,13,29,30 However, a gap exists in the literature regarding whether there is a relationship between fear of COVID-19 and health literacy levels in older adults during the pandemic. It is thought that determining the fear of COVID-19, health literacy levels, and the associated factors in older adults could lead to an increase in the awareness of older adults about the prevention and control of the disease, and guide healthcare professionals in their education of older adults. ...
Article
This study aimed to examine the fear of coronavirus and the health literacy levels of older adults during the pandemic. The sample consisted of 304 older adults from five family health centers in Turkey between April and May 2021. The data were collected using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale and the Health Literacy Scale. The fear of COVID-19 was found to be higher in women, those with chronic diseases, and those who found the epidemic measures insufficient (p < 0.05). The health literacy level was found to be higher in those with high education level, those in the 65-74 age group, and those with not using regular medicine (p < 0.001). The health literacy of older adults was a slightly above moderate level and the fear of COVID-19 was at a moderate level. Health literacy levels of older adults may be increased with written, visual, and verbal health trainings.
... Various studies have investigated COVID-19 fear and loneliness, particularly among older adults and geriatric groups [21][22][23]. However, comparatively fewer studies have explored COVID-19 fear and loneliness among diverse populations and professional groups [24]. ...
Article
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    Fear has been the most common emotional response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and excessive fear is associated with various indices of psychological distress, particularly loneliness. Although most people have experienced pandemic-related fear and distress, certain groups who are on the front of service provision have experienced the pandemic in distinct ways, owing to its impact on the nature of their work. Schoolteachers represent one such group; therefore, it is imperative to identify resources that can safeguard against negative mental-health outcomes in schoolteachers. The current study investigated the potential protective role of sense of coherence (SOC) and resilience in the relationship between COVID-19 fear and loneliness. The participants were South African schoolteachers (N = 355); the participants completed the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, the University of California Loneliness Scale, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-10, and the Sense of Coherence Scale-13. The results indicated that SOC and resilience had significant direct effects on loneliness, thereby suggesting their health-sustaining role. SOC and resilience also fully mediated the relationship between COVID-19 fear and loneliness. Therefore, although the provision of material resources is important, it is equally necessary to enhance people’s ability to comprehend, give meaning to, and manage the challenges associated with the pandemic. A salutogenic approach to mental health promotion in the workplace may be beneficial for enhancing SOC and resilience among schoolteachers.