Multiple-group analysis of WFGS: configural, metric, and residual invariance.

Multiple-group analysis of WFGS: configural, metric, and residual invariance.

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This research work had three objectives: (1) to analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Work–Family Guilt Scale, (2) to examine its invariance according to gender, and (3) to study the relationship between work–family guilt (WFG) and the different proposed antecedent (e.g., hours spent working, social support, rumination,...

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... = 0.87). In addition, the changes in CFI, NNFI, RMSEA, and SRMR were minimal in all the comparisons (see Table 2). Note. ...
Context 2
... = 0.87). In addition, the changes in CFI, NNFI, RMSEA, and SRMR were minimal in all the comparisons (see Table 2). ...

Citations

... Most of the studies on the impact of perfectionism on psychosocial adjustment have focused on samples of students [78]. However, recent studies have examined both forms of parental perfectionism and their relationship with work-family conflict-related guilt and found that discrepancies were only predictive of levels of guilt generated by work interfering in family life and not vice versa [79]. ...
... The latter has been linked to high levels of parental stress [82,83]. This form of rumination also seems to foster the guilt that parents feel regarding work interference in family life [79]. ...
... Parents with a positive predisposition towards having more children will excel in their levels of life satisfaction [39][40][41], agreeableness, extroversion [42][43][44] and social support [32,57]. In contrast, those who are negatively predisposed to having more children will show higher levels of parental stress [73][74][75], self-criticism, discrepancies, guilt linked to the work-family conflict [79], neuroticism and openness [42,43] and will tend to be older [64][65][66]. They will also perceive increased irritability in their children [84,85]. ...
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The fertility deficit in many European countries is related to a low rate of second births. Understanding the factors associated with the predisposition of one-child parents to have more children could contribute to the search for solutions to this social problem. Although previous evidence highlights the role of employment and social factors, psychological factors have been poorly investigated. This study examines the relationship between different psychosocial factors (rumination, personality, life satisfaction, perfectionism, social support, parental stress, guilt linked to work–family conflict, age and child temperament) and parents’ predisposition to have more children. The sample consisted of 96 one-child Spanish parents whose child was in early childhood education (59.3% women; Mage = 37.41). The results show that one-child parents with the predisposition to have more children, compared to those without a predisposition to have more children, showed higher levels of life satisfaction, extroversion and adaptive perfectionism but lower levels of rumination and parental stress. The social implications of these findings and how they may affect parenting today are discussed.
... The impact of gender on the relationship between PS, PR, and satisfaction with life (SWL) has not been studied. However, it has recently been shown that gender moderates the relationship between other emotional processes, such as guilt linked to the family-work conflict and life satisfaction (Gómez-Ortiz & Roldán-Barrios, 2021). Other studies show different consequences of PS in mothers and fathers (Crnic & Greenberg, 1990;Deater-Deckard & Scarr, 1996;Kuo & Johnson, 2021). ...
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The psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Parental Stress Scale (PSS) scale have not been verified on the Spanish population. Similarly, the literature on gender differences and parental stress is inconclusive, and there is little evidence of their relationship with life satisfaction. To analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the PSS scale, (2) to examine possible gender differences, and (3) to study the relationship between parental stress (PS) and parental rewards (PR) and satisfaction with life (SWL) attending to the possible moderating effect of gender. These objectives were examined in samples comprising Social Services Users (SSU) (N = 525; 78.3% female; Mage = 38.3) and non‐SSU users (N = 421; 41.1% male; Mage = 37.08). A CFA corroborated a two‐factor structure: PS and PR. In the SSU sample, mothers showed higher PS and lower PR. However, PR was also higher in mothers from the non‐SSU sample compared to fathers. PR and PS were directly related to SWL in the SSU sample. However, gender moderated the relationship between PR and SWL in the non‐SSU sample in the case of mothers. The results are discussed considering gender roles and the characteristics of both samples.