Figure - uploaded by Alfredo Saad-Filho
Content may be subject to copyright.
Mozambique: Balance of payments, 1980-87 (US$ million)

Mozambique: Balance of payments, 1980-87 (US$ million)

Context in source publication

Context 1
... Republica Popular de Moqambique (1986:27) The heavy losses experienced by the state farms, and by the state sector as a whole, drained the treasury, eroded the country's investment capacity, and led to inflation (Wuyts 1989). At the same time, the trade balance and the current account were persistently negative, a trend inherited from the colonial period (see Table 2). Given the collapse of the internal sources of accumulation, and the inability or unwillingness of the Soviet camp to provide additional help, the government turned to foreign capital. ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
This paper is drawn from the findings and recommendations of the UN Women East and Southern Africa led Multi-Country Analytical Study of Legislation, Policies, Interventions and Cultural Practices on Child Marriage in Africa undertaken in 2018. The study focused on Africa as a continent but with a deeper lens on 10 study countries (Niger, Mali, Nig...
Article
Full-text available
The cross-equatorial flow over the western Indian Ocean, known as the Findlater Jet, plays an important role in the monsoonal circulation of the region. During the boreal summer, there is southerly flow across the equator that is concentrated along the East African highlands. During the boreal winter, there is a reversal in wind direction across th...
Article
Full-text available
Lygodactyllus verticillatus (Gekkonidae) predation by Nephila madagascariensis (Nephilidae)

Citations

... Political economists, however, have typically highlighted social divisions and class formation arising from the "unleashing of capital accumulation" (Byres, 2003, p. 55;Lerche, 2010). Under these conditions, smallholders and rural landless people might not be attracted to new activities because of economic opportunities, but instead might be dispossessed because of rising costs, decreasing returns to labor, or forcible evictions (Bernstein, 1979;Saad Filho, 1997;van Vliet et al., 2015). ...
Article
Agricultural commercialization and livelihood diversification have been proposed as ways to bring economic prosperity to rural zones after long-term violent conflict. Critics, however, argue that these market-based interventions exacerbate, rather than resolve, older social divisions, and that commercialization needs to be seen as part of agrarian transition processes. This paper contributes to the analysis of livelihoods-based interventions under violent conflict by presenting research from Kachin State, Myanmar. Drawing on 276 household surveys plus interviews, the paper argues that agrarian transition has only occurred within larger landholders who have been able to increase farm size by expanding commercial agriculture onto land historically used for shifting cultivation. Smallholders, however, have been unable to expand agriculture in this way, partly because of the reallocation of agricultural land to favored investors, including Chinese banana plantations. Meanwhile, access to non-agricultural livelihoods is largely restricted to laboring in Burmese army-controlled jade mines, or to traders arriving from outside the region. These findings indicate a different outcome to research elsewhere in Myanmar that suggests agrarian transition processes can benefit landless people; and instead supports evidence elsewhere in Asia that the agrarian transition can become “truncated” if smallholders do not participate. Making the agrarian transition inclusive requires greater attention to the ethnic, and other social barriers for participation by smallholders and rural landless, rather than facilitating commercialization alone.
... Machel and his government was invested in 'socially engineering' (Scott 1998) Mozambique towards a 'New Nation', in which ideals of modernity shaped most of the legislation and policies towards an illuminated Homem Novo (New Man). This was a 'modernist Marxism, (Filho 1997) as opposed to the Marxisms that opened space for local knowledges like in Tanzania. In this period, modernism acted as an 'emancipatory ideology' (Sumich 2008) which clashed in complex ways with the local knowledges and authorities. ...
... Hence, the modernist socialist revolution was not only economic and political but also ideological; and science was the privileged weapon for liberation of black people's minds, bodies, and land. Consequently, this modernist Marxism that Frelimo adhered to was on a direct collision route with the local people and authorities (Filho 1997) as these related to their lands, fauna, and flora through institutions like spirits, kinship, and totems (see for example Virtanen 2002;Izidine et al. 2008;Simbine 2013) that were considered superstitious and ignored in the new era (see National Education System Law 1983, article 4). ...
... Here is why the concept of high-modern ideology proposed by James Scott proves to be resourceful, for it allowed to devise continuities in all periods of Mozambican legal life and show amalgamation of different legacies and power relations in the current legal landscape in Mozambique. Therefore, this enabled the article to show how the high modern-socialism that Mozambique chose to adhere to was in direct route of clash with the local knowledges in complex ways (Filho 1997), a stance that continued in neoliberal Mozambique. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article uses a short historical study of Mozambican conservation legislation to show how local knowledges have been systematically disenfranchised from legislation since colonial period through a discourse analysis of conservation legal documents including constitutions. This study shows that the country has favoured modernity as a framework to deal with nature conservation which clashed in complex ways with local modes of living. Hence the article uses James Scott's concept of 'high-modern ideology' to trace continuities and changes in local knowledges and people marginalisation because of conservation legislation since the colonial period to the present. The article shows that, more market-based approaches to nature conservation are currently being promoted by the state and international donors and organisations; this in turn could lead to local communities treating nature as a commodity.
... 133 and Hailey, 2000:403 andEdwards & Sen, 2000:606;612-614 and Behrman, 2001: 1-4).To facilitate the arrival of more foreign aid to Mozambique, the country joined the African Development Bank (ADB) in 1980, the Lome Convention (LC), the Paris Club (PC), the World Bank (WB) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1984. In 1987, the Structural Adjustment Package (SAP) was adopted(Saad-Filho, 1997:209 and Mittelman, 2000:95-97 and Simpson, 1992:4 and Wuyts, 1990. was the end of the modernist Marxist development model. ...
Article
This groundbreaking study investigates defining themes in the field of social memory studies as they bear on the politics of post-Cold-War, post-apartheid Southern Africa. Examining the government's attempts to revise postcolonial Mozambique's traumatic past with a view to negotiating the present, Alice Dinerman stresses the path-dependence of memory practices while tracing their divergent trajectories, shifting meanings and varied combinations within ruling discourse and performance. Central themes include: the interplay between past and present; the dialectic between remembering and forgetting; the dynamics between popular and official memory discourses; the politics of acknowledgement. Dinerman's original analysis is essential reading for students of modern Africa; the sociology of memory; Third World politics and post-conflict societies.
Article
After a critical analysis of the prevailing pattern and impact of the dominant model of intensive agricultural technology and of the Green Revolution, three different strategies for coping with current agricultural and ecological crisis are pointed out, relating to alternative forms of agricultural or social restructuring and technological development. On a theoretical level, the mainstream, deterministic conception of technology and some related approaches is rejected. Transcending structuralism and modernist Marxism, an alternative Marxist approach is proposed, which implies a dialectical, endogenous determination of technology. On a practical level, the 're-localization' argument is challenged as well as the idea that client-driven research, aiming at the development of an appropriate and environmentally compatible agricultural technology, could be effectively achieved by a market mechanism. On the contrary, it is argued that the development and application of an alternative and appropriate agricultural technology requires a wide-ranging social transformation and is primarily the task of a class conscious agricultural movement.
Article
In many areas of Africa, rural livelihoods depend heavily on subsistence farming. Using improved agricultural technologies can increase productivity in smallholder agriculture and thus raise household income and reduce poverty. Data from a nationally representative rural household survey from 2005 is used to assess the impact of four technologies - improved maize seeds, improved granaries, tractor mechanization, and animal traction - on household income in Mozambique. To ensure the robustness of the results, three econometric approaches were used: the doubly-robust estimator, sub-classification and regression, and matching and regression. The results show that, overall, using an improved technology did not have a statistically significant impact on household income. This may be associated with a widespread drought that occurred in 2005. Despite drought, distinguishing between households based on propensity score quintiles revealed that using improved technologies, especially improved maize seeds and tractors, significantly increased the income of those households who had better market access. Thus, to allow households to benefit from the use of improved technologies, policy makers need to reduce structural impediments to market participation by ensuring adequate road infrastructure and enabling access to markets.