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Modulor – Le Corbusier, Cathedrals and Human Proportions, Egyptian Temple and Human Proportions  

Modulor – Le Corbusier, Cathedrals and Human Proportions, Egyptian Temple and Human Proportions  

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This work discusses the relevance of architectural design towards the field of information visualization by showing historical and contemporary examples of built structures with encoded information. This overview should demonstrate that information visualization in three dimensional physical environments was already created throughout the history o...

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Special Purpose Simulation (SPS) is a proven principle that can lead to the effective transfer of simulation knowledge to the construction industry. Three separate industry experiments have led to the identification of a set of requirements that construction ...

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... Balinese architectural principles are derived from a social and cosmological system. This system focuses on the symbolical meaning and hierarchy of space [6]. This cosmological system is influenced by the spiritual belief that produces local wisdom in the Balinese daily life. ...
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Balinese royal palaces' forms illustrate the evolving nature of the kingdom's political control and the strategies used by its rulers to foster the stability of its territory. Although every kingdom has opportunities to demonstrate its authority through architecture and layout, architectural hierarchy is presented from the form of architectural productions, including the traditional gate called kori agung among palaces called puris, especially the architectural form in palaces of Gianyar. This phenomenon has risen to the questions on how far the authority power influences the architectural form. Are there any other elements that influence the architectural form design in Gianyar? Drawing from seventeenth-through twentieth-century photographs, correspondences and collected oral traditions, this paper explores the oral traditions and power relationships among the kingdoms that influence the layout and form of the palace's architectural production called puri in Gianyar Bali. This paper found that the phrase "memada-mada" has influenced the architecture of palaces in Gianyar, especially the kori agung. The term refers to attempting to avoid performing the same or greater acts as those with a higher status.
... Before entering the house, someone will be welcomed by the presence of angkul-angkul and aling-aling; then, passing through a kitchen, then continue to other areas. This hierarchy of activities is structured from activities in the profane space towards the most sacred areas (Ferschin & Gramelhofer, 2004). The changes of activities, jobs, and lifestyle have certainly affected the development of traditional Balinese houses. ...
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The development of the tourism sector has had various effects on Balinese people’s traditional practices, including the traditional Balinese house. Since the increase of Bali’s tourist activities, the traditional houses for the Balinese that demonstrated not only a way of shelter but also complex cultural links have become objects of transformation. This transformation tended to fade its meanings and values, even though the Balinese have tried to maintain their culture as tourism resources. This phenomenon is an architectural challenge for the people to produce an innovative design of the transformed house. A descriptive exploratory approach with qualitative methods was used in this paper. Using interviews, field works and architectural examination in Taro, Kendran, and Ubud, this paper explores innovative designs that not only can accommodate traditional functions of the houses but also address the new demands of tourists. Some alternative models of pavilions have been built in many parts of the house, such as in the backyard, adjacent to old pavilions, or by demolishing the old pavilions.
... Finally, the occupant can go to the family temple (①). The hierarchy demonstrates the order of activities and cultural spaces from domestic activities and spaces into ritual activities and spaces [40] (Figure 7). ...
... Before entering the house, someone will be welcomed by the presence of angkul-angkul and aling-aling; then, passing through a kitchen, then continue to other areas. This hierarchy of activities is structured from activities in the profane space towards the most sacred areas (Ferschin & Gramelhofer, 2004). The changes of activities, jobs, and lifestyle have certainly affected the development of traditional Balinese houses. ...
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The development of the tourism sector has had various effects on Balinese people’s traditional practices, including the traditional Balinese house. Since the increase of Bali’s tourist activities, the traditional houses for the Balinese that demonstrated not only a way of shelter but also complex cultural links have become objects of transformation. This transformation tended to fade its meanings and values, even though the Balinese have tried to maintain their culture as tourism resources. This phenomenon is an architectural challenge for the people to produce an innovative design of the transformed house. A descriptive exploratory approach with qualitative methods was used in this paper. Using interviews, field works and architectural examination in Taro, Kendran, and Ubud, this paper explores innovative designs that not only can accommodate traditional functions of the houses but also address the new demands of tourists. Some alternative models of pavilions have been built in many parts of the house, such as in the backyard, adjacent to old pavilions, or by demolishing the old pavilions.
... In Balinese traditions, the people enter the house from an angkul-angkul (⑧), a granary (⑦), a paon (③), a shrine in the natah (②), pavilions (the bale dauh ④, the bale daja ⑤, the bale dangin ⑥) and finally onto the family temple (①) (Figure 2). As indicated by red arrows in Figure 2, the ideal process for entering the house presents a hierarchy from profane areas into sacred areas (Ferschin and Gramelhofer, 2004) that also presents the cleaning process before entering the core of the house. ...
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Purpose COVID-19 caused dramatic changes in daily life, including the way people stay in a building. Since the virus's outbreak and the mandate of social distancing from WHO, a house has become an essential place for people to avoid the propagation of the virus. However, recent house configurations cannot satisfy people's needs when staying at home and have not provided complete protection from viruses. Therefore, architects are expected to create new configurations. In order to establish a new trend, this paper aimed to explore the ability of the traditional architectural concepts that discuss the efforts to produce suitable configurations. Design/methodology/approach To investigate to what extent the traditional Balinese concepts are still relevant to counter infectious diseases, architectural examinations and spatial stories were used as a method of investigations. Findings This paper found that certain traditional knowledge elements are still relevant to produce suitable configurations to deal with possible virus attacks and introduce more security layers to the house. Research limitations/implications Learning from the COVID-19 pandemic, this paper provides a view of traditional concepts that are now still applicable to modifications and adaptations. Practical implications In these modifications, the traditional hierarchy of entering the house and the function of open spaces for food production are traditional elements that address the protocol to face the virus. Social implications Local knowledge has given good things as a precious heritage from the Balinese communities' ancestors to face this new challenge. Originality/value This pandemic has taught architects to combine modern technologies with local wisdom as an approach to develop innovative antivirus designs.
... In this concept, one walked in a procession from an angkul-angkul, a granary, a paon, a natah, pavilions and finally onto a family temple. This pattern presented a hierarchy from a profane area into a sacred area (Ferschin & Gramelhofer, 2004) (see Figure 6), where it was related to a protection and purification process for the occupants. An angkul-angkul and an aling-aling were the first protection and prevention of bad evils entering the house (Covarrubias, 1974). ...
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... As a result, a rather large fraction of the current scientific literature on information architecture is either produced within the boundaries of other disciplines, with all negative consequences that usually carries along in the heavily compartmentalized academic discourse, or sadly out of touch with much of what has happened in the practice in the past 6­7 years and with the new, multi­disciplinary framings coming from architecture (Norberg­Schultz, 1971; Ferschin & Gramelhofer, 2004; Klyn, 2012; ), urban planning (Lynch, 1960; Jacobs, 1992), cognitive science (Johnson, 1987; Dourish, 2004), design and systems thinking (Meadows, 2006), new media (Norman & Lucas, 2000; Manovich, 2001; Tryon, 2009) that are reshaping the theory of information architecture. While happening on the borders of academic territory, conversations about labeling, websites, and hierarchies have been replaced by conversations around sense­making, place­making, design, architecture, new media, and embodied cognition (Hinton, 2009; Klyn, 2012; Fisher et al, 2012). ...
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The paper maintains that in the epistemological shift from postmodernism to pseudo-modernism, technological, economic, social, and cultural elements of change have thoroughly transformed the scenario in which information architecture operated in the late 1990s and have eroded its channel-specific connotation as a website-only, inductive activity, opening the field up to contributions coming from the theory and practice of design and systems thinking, architecture, cognitive science, cultural studies and new media. The paper argues, through a thorough discussions of causes and effects and selected examples taken from the practice, that contemporary information architecture can be thus framed as a fundamentally multi-disciplinary sense-making cultural construct concerned with the structural integrity of meaning in complex, information-based cross-channel ecosystems.
... As a result, a rather large fraction of the current scientific literature on information architecture is either produced within the boundaries of other disciplines, with all negative consequences that usually carries along in the heavily compartmentalized academic discourse, or sadly out of touch with much of what has happened in the practice in the past 67 years and with the new, multidisciplinary framings coming from architecture (NorbergSchultz, 1971;Ferschin & Gramelhofer, 2004;Klyn, 2012;), urban planning (Lynch, 1960;Jacobs, 1992), cognitive science (Johnson, 1987;Dourish, 2004), design and systems thinking (Meadows, 2006), new media (Norman & Lucas, 2000;Manovich, 2001;Tryon, 2009) that are reshaping the theory of information architecture. While happening on the borders of academic territory, conversations about labeling, websites, and hierarchies have been replaced by conversations around sensemaking, placemaking, design, architecture, new media, and embodied cognition (Hinton, 2009;Klyn, 2012;Fisher et al, 2012). ...
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