Modules P4 and P5 showing beet and carrot plant growth.

Modules P4 and P5 showing beet and carrot plant growth.

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Urban densification and climate change are creating a multitude of issues for cities around the globe. Contributing factors include increased impervious surfaces that result in poor stormwater management, rising urban temperatures, poor air quality, and a lack of available green space. In the context of volatile weather, there are growing concerns...

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... information is important for future policy decisions made by cities and could motivate decision makers to incentive rooftop farms rather than sedum-based GRs. The final test module (P5), shown with P4 in Figure 3, is also defined as a productive module that supports vegetable production. The P5 system utilizes a deeper blue roof retention layer. ...

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