Model of the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions Reprinted with permission of Guilford Press, Fredrickson and Cohn (2008, Figure 48.1) [17]. Figure 2. Conceptual framework of the study. 

Model of the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions Reprinted with permission of Guilford Press, Fredrickson and Cohn (2008, Figure 48.1) [17]. Figure 2. Conceptual framework of the study. 

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Purpose: Recently, the interest in positive psychotherapy is growing, which can help to encourage positive relationships and develop strengths of people. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of a positive psychotherapy program on positive affect, interpersonal relations, resilience, and mental health recovery in community-dwelling p...

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... The participants in the current study (mean age: 70 years old) scored resilience (converted to seven-point scale) as 4.4. This was similar to the study conducted by Kim & Na [41]. The subjects in this study were community dwellers with schizophrenia who have judgement and perception of reality, and reported with the mean score 4.3. ...
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Treatment of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia is less than optimal with an emphasis on biological treatments. Psychosocial interventions including different psychotherapies are increasingly recognized as an important component of treatment. Positive psychotherapy (PPT after Seligman/Rashid) is a modality of therapy that focuses on the healthy aspect of individual helping to unearth positive affect and strengths of character and through this mitigates symptoms and improves outcomes. The last decade has seen a significant growth in the interest in PPT, and several trials have been conducted to demonstrate its efficacy when provided in individual format and group therapy format. The efficacy data is meaningful and impacts client care when it is shown to be effective in real-world situations. This chapter pulls together the conceptual framework, the current evidence base, and clinical applications of PPT for psychotic conditions. The clinical examples of real-world scenarios show how these interventions can be used by the entire treatment team within their regular workflow so that these interventions can be sustainable. The chapter also talks about the existing limitations in evidence for PPT interventions and suggests directions for future research.
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