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Model illustrating domestication-induced transcriptional level changes in rice. Rice domestication suppressed the expression of genes related to abiotic stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging pathway, resulting hyper-susceptibility of cultivated rice towards various abiotic stresses.

Model illustrating domestication-induced transcriptional level changes in rice. Rice domestication suppressed the expression of genes related to abiotic stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging pathway, resulting hyper-susceptibility of cultivated rice towards various abiotic stresses.

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Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L), the important cereal crop, has low resistance to numerous biotic and abiotic stresses compared to its ancestral wild rice (Oryza rufipogon). Although genetic studies have shown that the susceptibility of cultivated rice towards various environmental stresses is due to its narrow genetic diversity caused by do...

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... cultivated rice is less resistant abiotic stress than wild rice. Taken together, we conclude that domestication-induced changes (suppression) of transcripts related to heat stress-and drought/salt stress-related pathways as well as ROS-scavenging pathway may contribute to reduce resistance and/or tolerance of cultivated rice to abiotic stresses (Fig. ...

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