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Metrosideros ‘Maungapiko’, a natural hybrid between p ō hutukawa and southern r ā t ā . Photo: Naturally Native NZ Plants. 

Metrosideros ‘Maungapiko’, a natural hybrid between p ō hutukawa and southern r ā t ā . Photo: Naturally Native NZ Plants. 

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... and a M. umbellata that forms an erect tree more like M. umbellata (Edwards, 1989;Hobbs, a 1992;ARC, 1999;Metcalf, 2000). It develops into a narrow, upright tree with an open habit that tends to lose its lower leaves. M. 'Maungapiko' has bright crimson blooms (resembling those of a southern rätä) that appear a little later than most pöhutukawa (Fig. 2). It is more frost tolerant and resistant to psyllid attack than cultivars of pöhutukawa. M. 'Maungapiko' was discovered by Graeme Platt in the early 1980s growing in mänuka scrub at the junction of Maungapiko Track and the old Whangaparapara -Port Fitzroy Road on Great Barrier Island. The original tree has since been destroyed by road ...
Context 2
... this reverse- variegated cultivar has bluntly pointed leaves with golden-yellow centres and green outer margins; young stems are red (Fig. 20A-B). It is currently available in both Australia and New Zealand (e.g., Kinsey, undated;Gaddum, 2001; Benara Nurseries online catalogue, 2010; Plant Production online catalogue, 2010). We do not know of its origins. ...

Citations

... In the South Island, M. excelsa is cultivated as far south as Jackson Bay on the west coast (Simpson 2005) and the Otago Peninsula on the east coast. There are also several M. excelsa trees on the Chatham Islands and cultivation occurs on Stewart Island (Dawson et al. 2010). Metrosideros excelsa has been introduced to many other countries including Australia, the USA and South Africa, where it has escaped from cultivation and is regarded as an invasive species (Yeates & Williams 2006;Dawson et al. 2010). ...
... There are also several M. excelsa trees on the Chatham Islands and cultivation occurs on Stewart Island (Dawson et al. 2010). Metrosideros excelsa has been introduced to many other countries including Australia, the USA and South Africa, where it has escaped from cultivation and is regarded as an invasive species (Yeates & Williams 2006;Dawson et al. 2010). ...
... Metrosideros excelsa naturally hybridises with M. robusta (early reports of this include Kirk 1899; Carse 1927;Cooper 1954) because the species distributions and flowering times commonly overlap. This typically occurs inland from the coast and towards the end of flowering by M. excelsa (Dawson et al. 2010). Hybrid populations are present in the Rotorua and Tarawera Lakes areas and also on Rangitoto Island (Cooper 1954;Clarkson 1990;Dawson et al. 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
We review the biology and ecology of Metrosideros excelsa (Myrtaceae), an endemic angiosperm evergreen tree. Metrosideros excelsa belongs to a conspicuous and widely distributed Pacific Basin genus, with centres of diversity in both New Zealand and New Caledonia. Metrosideros excelsa is an iconic tree species that forms a significant component of northern New Zealand's exposed coastal headland and cliff vegetation. Where conditions are more favourable, M. excelsa forms tall coastal forest, ranging from simple young high-density stands to diverse mature forest. Inland, M. excelsa stands are confined to the margins of lakes and rivers on the Central Volcanic Plateau, where some may originate from early Māori plantings. Metrosideros excelsa is reliant on stochastic disturbance events (e.g. landslides, volcanic eruptions) to create open sites necessary for regeneration. Mass flowering (December–January), followed by abundant production of wind-dispersed seed maximises chance colonisation of such sites. Since human settlement in New Zealand, the distribution of M. excelsa forest has declined by c. 90% and the southern limit of the species has retreated north. Natural regeneration on the mainland is limited by the infrequency of large-scale disturbances and increased anthropogenic and herbivore pressures. Consequently, M. excelsa forest has become rare and localised on the mainland; monitoring and active management are fundamental to the species' long-term conservation.
... M. 'Lemon Twist': Dawson et al. (2010a) commented that this new Australian-raised cultivar is low growing and named after its reverse-variegated and unusual twisted foliage. growing selection of Metrosideros. ...
... M. 'Dalese' (Dawson et al., 2010a) has the same low growing habit with short internodes but is nonvariegated. Other than this difference in variegation, M. 'Dalese' and M. 'Lemon Twist' are very similar and probably share the same parentage. ...
... as noted by Dawson et al. (2010a), this reverse-variegated cultivar is currently available in Australia and New Zealand. It has bluntly pointed leaves with golden-yellow centres and green outer margins, and the young stems are red. ...
... umbellata Cav. (e.g., Allan, 1961;a Dawson, 1985;Dawson et al., 2010aDawson et al., , 2010bGaddum, 1997Gaddum, , 1999aGaddum, , 1999bGaddum, , 2001Metcalf, 1987Metcalf, , 2000Simpson, 2005). The Pacifi c Island M. collina (sold under various names) and to a limited extent the Lord Howe M. nervulosa are also cultivated in a warmer regions of New Zealand. ...
... M. polymorpha Gaudich. is seldom a cultivated and not generally available from New Zealand nurseries. M. queenslandica L.S.Sm. was a listed as cultivated in New Zealand (Gaddum, 1997(Gaddum, , 1999a(Gaddum, , 1999b(Gaddum, , 2001 Dawson et al. (2010aDawson et al. ( , 2010b. All eight interspecifi c hybrids that have been selected and named as cultivars are from New Zealand species in subgenus Metrosideros. ...
... These r r articles provide brief descriptions and details of history, selection and naming (e.g., Redgrove, 1983;Edwards, 1987aEdwards, , 1987bEdwards, , 1989Edwards, , 1990aEdwards, , 1990bEdwards, , 1990cEdwards, , 1991Edwards, , 2000Metcalf, 1987Metcalf, , 2000Hutchinson, 1988;Hobbs, 1992;ARC, 1999). After a ten-year gap in relevant publications, the most comprehensive and recent accounts upon which this checklist is predominantly based is Dawson et al. (2010aDawson et al. ( , 2010b. ...