Figure 2 - uploaded by Marie Battiste
Content may be subject to copyright.
Métis Holistic Lifelong Learning Model (CCL, 2007, p. 21; reprinted with permission). 

Métis Holistic Lifelong Learning Model (CCL, 2007, p. 21; reprinted with permission). 

Source publication
Chapter
Full-text available
The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL), in collaboration with the Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre (ABLKC), and First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples, created three Holistic Lifelong Learning Models (HLLM) that reveal an Indigenous framework for understanding individual and collective well-being among these groups. The models have shown to hav...

Citations

... The approach to the course is represented as a braid, with the visual symbolism of weaving between Indigenous and Western approaches to learning, being, and doing. For instance, Indigenous content is incorporated (e.g., community stories and teachings about meanings of wellness, the land as a determinant of health, the Circle of Courage [Brendtro et al., 1990], holistic lifelong learning models [Bouvier et al., 2016]) while delivery of the course occurs primarily within a Canadian university classroom. In this way we see Indigenous and Western systems coming together. ...
Article
Full-text available
Postsecondary institutions across Canada have implemented various Indigenization strategies. Critical reflection is needed about the development, implementation, and impact of these strategies to ensure they serve more than checked boxes, and that they strive towards institutional decolonization. The purpose of this article is to present the development of an undergraduate course on Indigenous wellness at a Canadian postsecondary institution. Applying a reflective case narrative scholarly approach, we self-situate to present contextual information about ourselves and the course, as well as our motivation for course development and the scope of curriculum design. We consider five indicators of course design success within Dimitrov and Haque’s (2016) intercultural curriculum design competencies, and we recommend changes to the course design process for Indigenization sake. Reflecting on and interpreting our approach, we propose a three-party relational model to Indigenous course development consisting of the course instructor, a keeper of traditional knowledges, and a teaching and learning expert. In doing so we attempt to inform and prompt the thinking of others with similar or related course design goals.
... Indigenous learning involves the intergenerational transmission of knowledge, relationships, and responsibilities (Bouvier et al., 2016). Within Indigenous cultures, Elders impart learning to the younger generation and are a crucial part of a community's social, spiritual, ancestral, and natural environment (Dei, 2000). ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the relevance of Indigenous perspectives within the nursing profession, and the importance of weaving these perspectives into nursing education. We suggest that Indigenous perspectives can support nursing’s core ethical values of relationality and holism and may hold representational and transformational possibilities for students and educators alike. Guided by principles of Indigenous learning, we provide several exemplars from Canadian schools of nursing that have already begun the process of decolonizing their programs. We conclude by describing some of the challenges and considerations that may arise when Indigenous perspectives and approaches are considered for inclusion into nursing education programs.
... Indigenous educational researchers are vigilant about addressing the transformative power of Indigenous knowledge systems (Bouvier et al. 2016). Indigenous communities and their formulations of education, which address the perpetuation of Indigenous lands and natural resources, knowledges and cultural practices, speak directly to the will of local cultures. ...
Article
This article considers the contributions of Indigenous knowledges to educational research. It proposes the term comparative Indigenous education research (CIER) in an effort to promote Indigenous-centred research approaches in comparative and international Indigenous education studies. Through CIER, Indigenous peoples and communities articulate research priorities, locate sites of research that raise issues of universal and local concern, and engage community-based responses that are locally and globally relevant beyond nation-state borders. The article draws on the evolution of comparative education and proposals for research approaches that utilise underrepresented lenses, as well as manifestations of endogenous philosophies, specifically Indigenous research methodologies. Conceptual frames for considering CIER through practice are also offered, based on comparative research that crosses disciplines and borders, as well as research with Indigenous communities and researcher observations that reflect epistemological commitment to Indigenous peoples.
... The Office of the Auditor General's (2011) June status report found that the gap in educational outcomes defined as high school completion among First Nations and other youth was continuing to widen because of the federal government's failures to adjust both the "funding mechanism and delivery model" to ensure equitable access for eligible students. While there has been greater justice to the diversity of educational attainment within the Aboriginal population, and across geographic contexts, success often remains ill-defined beyond mainstream standards such as graduation and employment rates (Bouvier, Battiste, & Laughlin, 2016;CCL, 2007;Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, 2010). 1 Given the disparities in funding mechanisms and lack of services provided students, as well as the government's compromised ability to provide adequate education, the Office of the Auditor General (2004) predicted that it would take 28 years before Aboriginal children would be able to catch up to other Canadians. ...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous communities and students have been marginalized by colonial practices, disproportionally referred to special education programs, and encounter systematic prejudice and discrimination in education systems that lack respect for their ways of knowing and being. To disrupt hierarchical practices and structures that enact a hidden curriculum of privilege and racism, reconciliation and educational and system transformation need to work in tandem. Drawing on critical case study guided by Indigenous Storywork principles, we are researching how Professional Learning Networks (PLNs) can support educators and Indigenous community partners’ collaboration to decentre colonizing education practices. Analysis of preliminary data offers a window into the potential and complexity of engaging in decolonizing work that asks educators to unpack their role in reconciliation efforts and unlearn much of what they believed to be ethical practice. Findings include: participants awakening to structural inequities and racism; white/settler participants engaging with difficult knowledge; educators emphasizing their need for external resources to decolonize their practice; and a delicate balance between educators feeling challenged, feeling hopeful, and recognizing the distance yet to be travelled. This study demonstrates that collaboration with Indigenous community partners within education change networks (ECNs) holds potential to support pedagogical transformation and ultimately redefine student success.
Chapter
Indigenous health scholars have argued that Indigenous-led research that features the perceptions of Indigenous Peoples themselves may play an important role in identifying better and more sustainable ways to foster well-being and health. The need to focus on the well-being and health of Indigenous women is particularly vital, as Indigenous women experience a greater proportion of ill health when compared to Indigenous men and non-Indigenous People. In this chapter, I examine the results of Wiisokotaatiwin (an Anishinaabe concept that means gathering together for a purpose), a seven-week consciousness-raising process. Through Wiisokotaatiwin, urban Indigenous women participated in a consciousness-raising programme that used critical dialogues coupled with physical activity to discuss the connections between colonization, decolonization, physicality, and health and wellness. Results from this novel study indicated that Wiisokotaatiwin enabled the creation of community through critical dialogue, which resulted in the challenging of their marginalization and an enhancement of their well-being.