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Meggitt-Wagner classification of foot ulcers

Meggitt-Wagner classification of foot ulcers

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Diabetic foot is a serious complication of diabetes which aggravates the patient's condition whilst also having significant socioeconomic impact. The aim of the present review is to summarize the causes and pathogenetic mechanisms leading to diabetic foot, and to focus on the management of this important health issue. Increasing physicians' awarene...

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... from this rather crude classification, many efforts have been made to categorize foot ulcers according to extent, size and depth, location, presence of infection, and ischemia. The Meggitt-Wagner classification is one of the most popular validated classifications for the foot ulcers (Table 2). Other classification systems for diabetic foot ulcers have also been proposed and validated [27]. ...

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Citations

... Skin integrity should be assessed for hydration, erythema, warmth and callus formation which may result from tissue damage. Foot structure should be assessed for bony and nail deformity and joint-movement limitation (Alexiadou & Doupis, 2012). ...
... Thus, patients with DM are at 17 and 15 times higher risk of developing DFUs and undergoing amputation surgery, respectively, as compared with their non-diabetic counterparts [10]. To date, early management and treatment protocols for diabetic foot have been well described in the literature [11,12]. However, there are no evidence-based guidelines for continuous surgeries after the initial surgery or amputations in patients with diabetic foot [13]. ...
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... The chances of developing diabetic foot ulcers can be reduced by following simple strategies like regular foot examination, educating the patient regarding foot care, and following simple hygiene practices. The interdisciplinary approach to diabetic foot disorders has been shown to be the best way to obtain favorable limb salvage rates in high-risk diabetic patients [5]. ...
... Poor management or neglecting wounds in diabetics can lead to DFS, bad ulcerations and amputations [1]. From an epidemiological point of view, about 15% of diabetics had amputations, and these patients have high levels of mortality [2]. Moreover, the risk of poor wound healing in diabetic patients increases in parallel with the duration of diabetes and age [3]. ...
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... The solutions were stirred continuously for 30 min at room temperature and left to stand for 24 h. The emulsification efficiency was calculated as follows [4]: ...
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Diabetes-related foot infections and ulcers are frequent complications of the condition. These problems are also frequent, cause significant discomfort, frequently come back, and lead to morbidity and mortality, placing a huge financial burden on the patient and society. To start and direct treatment, it is crucial to comprehend the role of important contributing factors such as diabetic neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and immune system dysfunction. Beginning with a comprehensive physical examination and detailed history, diabetic foot disease is managed. A thorough medical examination should pay particular attention to any indication of diabetic foot ulcers or infection, as well as the symptoms of peripheral vascular disease and diabetic neuropathy. Analgesics and antibiotics should be used for pain management and infection control respectively. A multidisciplinary strategy focusing on patient education should be incorporated into prevention measures.
... Today, DFU is treated using a multimodal strategy that includes glucose control, infection eradication, ulcer healing promotion, and high-pressure remission [56][57][58]. It has been shown that in diabetic patients with foot wounds, strict glycemic management dramatically reduces the chance of amputation [59]. Additionally, few research studies on humans and animals have looked at the effects of vitamin and natural component supplements on DFU's metabolic variables and wound healing [60]. ...
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