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Measurement of capillary density (A) and blood pressure (B) during the first treatment cycle of sunitinib 50 mg/day in a 4 weeks on 2 weeks off schedule in three individual patients with advanced renal cell cancer. Capillary density is expressed as baseline capillary density in number (n) per square millimeter. In one patient, the sunitinib dose was reduced during the second cycle and additional measurements were carried out after the second off period (= day 84). MAP, mean arterial blood pressure.  

Measurement of capillary density (A) and blood pressure (B) during the first treatment cycle of sunitinib 50 mg/day in a 4 weeks on 2 weeks off schedule in three individual patients with advanced renal cell cancer. Capillary density is expressed as baseline capillary density in number (n) per square millimeter. In one patient, the sunitinib dose was reduced during the second cycle and additional measurements were carried out after the second off period (= day 84). MAP, mean arterial blood pressure.  

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