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Means and Standard Deviations for the Statistically Significant Grade Differences

Means and Standard Deviations for the Statistically Significant Grade Differences

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The authors explored different aspects of children's reading motivation and how children's motivation related to the amount and breadth of their reading. The reading motives assessed included self-efficacy, intrinsic–extrinsic motivation and goals, and social aspects. Fourth- and 5th-grade children ( N = 105) completed a new reading motivation ques...

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... Reading self-efficacy A modified version of the Motivation for Reading Questionnaire (MRQ) was administered (Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997) to measure students' reading selfefficacy. The scale consisted of three items from the MRQ reading efficacy (e.g., "I am a good reader.") ...
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Reading interventions that focus on metacognitive strategy instruction for elementary students reveal positive effects but also require extensive teacher training and significant oversight by the research team. In the current study, a more ‘hands off’ scalable approach to strategy instruction was tested, where initial teacher training and materials were provided to Grade 3-5 teachers to integrate into their classrooms over a full academic year. Students in the treatment condition (N = 195) were contrasted with students in a typical classroom practice comparison group (N = 212). Structural equation modeling revealed that students in the intervention showed greater gains in strategic awareness and on a standardized test of reading comprehension and vocabulary than their peers in the comparison group. Interestingly, the benefits of the intervention were consistent across grade levels, and prior reading performance and reading self-efficacy.
... Motivation plays a fundamental role in reading and directly affects reading achievement. In fact, many previous studies in the literature have indicated that motivation is effective in the reading process (Akyol, 2005;Baker & Wigfield, 1999;Guthrie & Wigfield, 2000;Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997;Wigfield, Guthrie, Tonks & Prencevich, 2004;Öztürk & İleri Aydemir, 2013). Wigfield, Gladstone, and Turci (2016) also said that children's reading motivation is related to their reading comprehension skills, because generating a new meaning about a book necessitates a number of motivational processes.When this process is carried out consciously, meaning-making, which is complicated for the student, is realised more efficiently (Monteiro, 2013). ...
... In the research, the 'Motivation for Reading Questionnaire' (MRQ) developed by Guthrie and Wigfield (1997) and adapted into Turkish by Yıldız (2010), and the 'Self-Efficacy Perception Scale for Reading Comprehension' (SPSRC) developed by Kula and Budak (2020) were used. Detailed information about the scales is given below. ...
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This study aims to investigate the relationship between the reading motivation and reading comprehension self-efficacy perceptions of fourth-grade students.The research model is the correlational survey model, one of the quantitative research methods. The study group of the research consists of 571 students studying in the fourth grade. The ‘Reading Motivation Scale’ and the ‘Reading Comprehension Self-efficacy Perception Scale’ were used as data collection tools. The SPSS statistical software program was used for the analysis of the data. Independent Samples T-Test and ANOVA, which are parametric tests, were used in the analysis of the data. When the results obtained in the study were examined, it was seen that the students’ reading motivation total scores were at a ‘good’ level, and that there was no significant difference in their total scores according to the gender and Turkish report card grade variables. Similarly, it was concluded that the students’ reading comprehension self-efficacy perception total scores were also at a ‘good’ level, and that there was no difference between students depending on the gender and Turkish report card grade variables. Finally, it was determined that there was a ‘moderate’ positive relationship between the students’ reading motivations and their reading comprehension self-efficacy perceptions.
... In addition, students' internal motivations in the reading process positively affect the process of understanding (Wigfield and Guthrie, 1997;Yıldız and Akyol, 2011). Students who are motivated to read also increase their commitment to reading. ...
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... The two aspects of habitual intrinsic reading motivation-reading for enjoyment and reading for interestwere measured in Grade 7 using two self-report scales (see appendix Table 6) adapted from the questionnaire by Möller and Bonerad (2007). This instrument is a German adaption of the Motivations for Reading Questionnaire (Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997) and was piloted with good quality criteria and used in previous studies (Schiefele et al., 2012). The scales included 3 items each, accompanied by four-point response scales (1: strongly disagree, 4: strongly agree). ...
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... The MRQ (Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997) was the most frequently used measure of both intrinsic (n = 28 studies) and extrinsic (n = 24 studies) motivation to read. The next most frequently used measure, for both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, was the Chinese Reading Motivation Questionnaire (CRMQ; Lau, 2004), which is an adaptation of the MRQ. ...
... Finally, we determined one study was aligned with the 2004 version of the MRQ only after we found the dissertation on which the study was based. The original article we collected for our research synthesis cited Wigfield and Guthrie (1995), which is the same as Wigfield and Guthrie (1997), as the source of the MRQ. In that article, the author did not report any information about item text or number of items in composites or subscales. ...
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Motivation to read is a central consideration for teachers and researchers because it is strongly associated with reading performance and is generally accepted as a positive state. The study of reading motivation is plagued by inconsistent terminology and measurement, which impedes a comprehensive knowledge base for teachers and researchers. One of the most prevalent conceptualizations is intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to read. This review examines the research literature over the last 29 years on intrinsic and extrinsic reading motivation in an attempt to add clarity to the field regarding constructs and measurement. We identified study contexts, theoretical perspectives, and data sources to examine how literacy scholars have studied intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to read. Results provide an overview of the contexts, theories, and research designs used to investigate intrinsic and extrinsic reading motivation.
... The question "Do I want it?" is part of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. The individual's expectations are related to the concept of self-efficacy (Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997). Students' self-efficacy beliefs are related to the performance-based environment (Eccles et al., 1993;Wigfield, Eccles & Rodriguez, 1998). ...
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... In the L1 reading context, many studies have proposed different models of reading motivation. For instance, Wigfield and Guthrie (1997) classified L1 reading motivation into "self-efficacy beliefs" (including reading efficacy and reading challenge), "intrinsic-extrinsic motivation and purpose for learning" (including curiosity, involvement, reading importance, reading avoidance, competition, recognition, and grades), and "social aspects of motivation" (including compliance and reading for social reasons; p. 420). Wang and Guthrie (2004) later established an intrinsic-extrinsic motivation model to explain reading motivation in the L1 context. ...
... With regard to mainland Chinese students' English reading motivation, Wang and Gan (2021) have developed a reading motivation questionnaire in an English as a foreign language context (RMQ-EFL) which includes five dimensions, namely, reading efficacy, reading enjoyment, reading recognition, reading involvement, and reading compliance. The five dimensions of RMQ-EFL have their theoretical basis in the reading motivational constructs proposed by Wigfield and Guthrie (1997), Wang and Guthrie (2004), and Mori (2002). ...
... Wang and Gan (2021) questionnaire was used in this study for three reasons. First, this questionnaire had its theoretical origin in Wigfield and Guthrie's (1997) and Wang and Guthrie's (2004) reading motivational constructs. Second, the reliability and validity of this questionnaire were tested through EFA and CFA using robust psychometric measures. ...
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This study explored how reading motivation, self-regulated reading strategies and English vocabulary knowledge influenced students’ English reading comprehension simultaneously in one model. A total of 543 students from five universities in Southern China completed a reading motivation questionnaire, a reading strategy questionnaire, two vocabulary knowledge tests, and a reading comprehension test. Multiple regression analysis results showed that reading efficacy and enjoyment, and vocabulary knowledge (i.e., both vocabulary breadth and depth) significantly predicted reading comprehension. When students were grouped into high, average, and low achievers on the reading test, monitoring strategies and vocabulary depth were found to significantly predict reading comprehension for the high achievers.
... From the selected literature search, it was found that large scale surveys especially in Englishspeaking countries like United States and United Kingdom became popular instruments that were utilised to gauge reading motivation via reading attitudes of young children to young adults. These instruments typically gauged both how much and how positive attitudes were towards reading in the understanding that they were strong indicators of reading motivation levels (Clark & Foster, 2005;McKenna, 2001;Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997b). One striking difference is that the research field of motivation in general and reading motivation in particular has seen significant progress in the West. ...
... Refer to Table 1. (Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997b) • Demography/Background • Self-perception of reading ability • Attitude towards reading motivation ...
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The reading experience in the Malaysian context is often perceived and understood as being about reading in specific languages. Particularly, research in the field of English as a Second Language is replete with work on reading motivation. However, in this paper, it is argued that reading needs to be seen as going beyond language, setting reading as an experience rather than an ability. This paper therefore sets out to validate the My Reading Experience Questionnaire (MREQ) through a discussion of the questionnaire design as well as the statistical data validation based on the questionnaire items. From there, reading motivation levels of primary school children in Malaysia is analysed. 544 primary school children aged 8 and 11-yearsold completed the MREQ. Findings from the questionnaire were matched with the Malay language reading comprehension levels of these children. Both the validation and comparisons showed that the MREQ not only gauges reading motivation levels but also reveals the complexities that come with Malaysia’s multilingual literacy context in schools. This paper concludes by proposing for the MREQ to continue to be used especially with how its design is underpinned by sociocultural theories of language and literacy.
... Researchers have also consistently shown that reading motivation is closely related to academic performance. Middle school students who spend at least six hours a week reading books showed higher academic performance [37], and fifth graders' voluntary reading outside of school had a 16% higher impact on reading skills compared to kids who did not engage in voluntary reading. It was also reported that students with strong reading motivation show higher academic performance [38] and use more diverse cognitive strategies [39]. ...
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The present study aims to observe the patterns of newspaper subscription and reading and further explore the structural relationship between parent–child interactions, children’s reading motivation, and academic achievement in families with school-age children. Online surveys were administered to 1361 parents of elementary students from grade 1 to 6 across South Korea. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS and AMOS to conduct frequency analysis, correlation analysis, structural equation modeling, and bootstrapping analysis. Results showed the following. First, 17.0% of households subscribed to a newspaper, 28.5% of parents read paper newspapers, and 97.1% of parents read online newspapers. Second, parent–child interaction using newspapers had an indirect effect on children’s academic achievement through the mediating effect of reading motivation. Overall results revealed the functions of newspaper as part of home literacy environment and the newspaper’s positive contribution to a child’s reading motivation and academic achievement.
... Research suggests that students' motivation to read is central to their overall success with reading (Morgan & Fuchs, 2007;Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997). However, research also asserts that the motivation for students to read decreases with age (Baker & Wigfield, 1999;Ivey & Broaddus, 2001;McKenna et al., 1995;. ...
... Students' academic success strongly correlates to their reading proficiency (Bozack & Salvaggio, 2013;Morgan & Fuchs, 2007;Wigfield & Guthrie, 1997). Students who experience continued success with reading and feel confident in their reading abilities demonstrate increased motivation, effort, and perseverance with reading than their peers (Curwood, 2013;Schunk et al., 2012). ...
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The theme of this year is Educate to Liberate. A reminder to faculty in the field that education and literacy extends beyond the content and courses we teach. As Freire puts it, “Leaders who do not act dialogically, but insist on imposing their decisions, do not organize the people—they manipulate them.” Instead, as literacy educators we should strive to work along with our students, to co-create with them, to learn from them. Freire reminds us too that “the (literacy) teacher is of course an artist...What the educator does in teaching is to make it possible for students to become themselves.” Therefore, as literacy educators and researchers, it is our duty to provide access and opportunities for students of all socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds as they navigate their way in our classrooms. All the articles within this 43rd Yearbook represent a portion of the ses- sions presented at the conference. After a peer-review process for conference acceptance, the ensuing articles underwent an additional two rounds of double- blind peer review before acceptance in the Yearbook. It is our sincere hope that the articles reflect the theme and embolden our practice to Educate to Liberate. xiii —JA, AB, KD, & NC