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Mean densities (±1 SE) of Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, Epinephelus polyphekadion and Plectropomus areolatus on the deep (20 m) transect before, during and after new moon in February and March 2005 and 2006.  

Mean densities (±1 SE) of Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, Epinephelus polyphekadion and Plectropomus areolatus on the deep (20 m) transect before, during and after new moon in February and March 2005 and 2006.  

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Within the marine conservation community there is considerable interest in combining local knowledge and science to achieve management objectives. Yet there remain few studies which have examined the merits and caveats of local knowledge, or shown how combining both knowledge systems has resulted in better management outcomes. This study outlines c...

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... of different species caught in the night time creel survey conducted between the 23rd of January and 20th April 2001. Data is summed across 41 separate spearfishing trips during this period. Eleven trips targeted the fish spawning aggregation (FSA) and 30 trips targeted outer reefs outside the FSA but within 12 km of the FSA (see Section 2.3). (Fig. ...

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... In such context case, ILK systems could be considered as an alternative to increase the efficiency of planning where modern, global and exogenous knowledge has failed to promote sustainable resource use (Agrawal 1995). The actions and practices based on these ILK systems are driven from trial and errors, plus knowledge transmission and constant monitoring of local resources associated with management and planning, which can result in higher efficiency and chance of success (Berkes et al. 2000;Johannes et al. 2000;Hamilton et al. 2012). Indeed, ILK systems provide critical contributions for a comprehensive evaluation of marine ecosystems (Hill et al. 2020). ...
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Despite the potentially huge contributions that coastal communities might make in marine resource management and sustainability, their participation in such efforts have only been recognized recently, particularly in Southeast Asia. Involving community perceptions can offer new insights for policy makers and resource managers and can elicit strong commitment and support from the communities themselves. This article aims to understand the perceptions of coastal communities of local environmental issues, specifically how these have developed over time, to understand the expectations and perceptions of trends. Sixteen marine environmental issues were identified during stakeholder meetings in Palawan, Philippines. A co-developed survey was administered to 431 respondents from coastal communities in two municipalities (Taytay and Aborlan) and in the city of Puerto Princesa in Palawan. The results show variation in the perceptions and expectations across issues. We find that communities expect positive trends for mangrove coverage, beach tree cover, and seagrass coverage as well as for seaweed farming and quality of drinking water. The amount of plastic litter, wild fish and shellfish, and the severity of sewage pollution are perceived to get slightly worse. The aquaculture sector is expected to remain unchanged in the future as it had been in the past. We also find significant differences in how people from different areas of residence perceive their marine environment. In the discussion, we mapped these different community perceptions on existing policies and their implementation. We further recommend how community perceptions can be integrated into resource management and policy making in the future.