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-Maturity of Organisations

-Maturity of Organisations

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Conference Paper
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Hong Kong is experiencing a massive increase in construction output. However, the cost of work-related accidents and ill-health in the construction industry account for as much as 8.5% of project costs when social, direct and indirect costs are included. The industry in general is receptive to change and becoming more OHS conscious but the forces d...

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Context 1
... this means that three different foci of attention should be provided for those contractors, and developers, falling into the three categories of immature, maturing and mature. This approach is illustrated in Table 1 and points to the need to develop quite separate strategies for the "three levels" of participants in the industry; one size does not fit all. ...

Citations

... Workers may think that they are able to get the job done without following safety rules and procedures. Their "can do" attitude creates vicious circle by never saying no to unreasonable demands from clients on speed, such as the four-day floor cycle can hardly be achieved in other locations (Rowlinson, Yip & Poon, 2008). ...
... The result sheds light on the importance of HRO since it originates the proximal factors which consequently affect the intention of safety compliance. The findings are in line with the advocation in Rowlinson, Yip and Poon (2008) that the maturity of organisations is one of the aspects where new initiatives need to be developed in the Hong Kong construction industry. ...
Conference Paper
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Despite there are numerous studies on accident causation, the improvement of construction safety seems at a standstill. Recent studies advocate the concept of “socio-technical system” which recognises the complexity of construction safety. Within the socio-technical system, “human” is one of the keys to accidents, and the construction workers are the victims of accidents. However, there is no well-established theoretical framework for understanding the safety compliance of construction workers. This paper aims to examine the safety compliance of the construction workers in the Hong Kong construction industry. Safety compliance model was developed by operationalising Theory of Planned Behaviour in Hong Kong construction industry. A questionnaire was administrated for measuring the proximal and distal factors affecting safety compliance and self-reported safety compliance level among Hong Kong construction workers. A total of three hundred sixty-five valid responses obtained from two large contractors used for analysis. The results suggest that Hong Kong construction workers’ intention is positively linked to safety compliance. Two proximal factors are perceived behavioural control and attitude. These proximal factors significantly affect the workers’ intention. Whereas, a high-reliability organising contributes two proximal factors and descriptive norms. The findings highlight the importance of interventions for improving the workers’ intention of safety compliance. Construction organisations also need to advocate the need for high-reliability organising. The study further shed light on safety engagement as the next step for safety management in the Hong Kong construction industry.
... With ageing, there will be a general deterioration in physical capacity and an increase in the risk of work-related disabilities [3]. Occupational disability has been found to be the prime reason contributing to the early dropout of construction workers worldwide [4]. To reduce the premature loss of construction workers as a result of work-related disability, the concept of work ability measurement has been increasingly used in recent years as an important tool to develop suitable interventions [5][6][7][8]. ...
... Supported H1. 3 Leisure-time physical activity will be positively associated with the WAI. Supported H1. 4 Sleep quality will be positively associated with the WAI. Supported ...
... Supported H4. 3 Job control is positively associated with the WAI. Supported H4. 4 Social support is positively associated with the WAI. Supported ...
Article
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The shortage in Hong Kong of construction workers is expected to worsen in future due to the aging population and increasing construction activity. Construction work is dangerous and to help reduce the premature loss of construction workers due to work-related disabilities, this study measured the work ability of 420 Hong Kong construction workers with a Work Ability Index (WAI) which can be used to predict present and future work performance. Given the importance of WAI, in this study the effects of individual and work-related factors on WAI were examined to develop and validate a WAI model to predict how individual and work-related factors affect work ability. The findings will be useful for formulating a pragmatic intervention program to improve the work ability of construction workers and keep them in the work force.
... Much progress has been made during the last 15 years but improvement has seemed to reach a plateau in recent years. A study funded by the Construction Industry Institute has confirmed that most safety measures are effective and mature organisations have better performance (Rowlinson et al., 2009). Three plateaus can be identified from the graph of accident rates vs. time. ...
Article
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For decades the Hong Kong construction industry has been characterized by a stressful work environment and with a poor safety record. Construction personnel under prolonged job stress are more prone to making errors which can eventually lead to fatal construction accidents. Further, the job burnout experienced by construction personnel can reveal the linkage with safety performance. This study aims to investigate the impact of job burnout experienced by construction managers on safety performance. Thirty senior construction personnel attended the semi-structured interviews and each delivered a detailed account rich enough to be considered to be a case study. The findings from the interviews indicate that the effect of job burnout on safety performance is mixed and complex. Job burnout has a direct effect, no effect or an indirect effect through some mediators on safety performance. The level of involvement of individual staff and reliability of the work system also affect the degree of the linkage. Generally the contractor staff feel more stressful particularly when fatigue is an issue. Social aspects such as bureaucratization of the safety management system, under-evaluation of the contribution from safety personnel, and rivalry manoeuvring have an adverse effect. Good working relationships, quality of workforce and company organisational culture are dilutions to the burnout effect. It is worth noting that an individual’s ability to dilute and accept the burnout effect plays a key role in the final reaction. This paper, based on an exploratory study, attempts to present the impact of the effect of job burnout on safety performance and provides an innovative approach to analyse accidents based on human causes.
... Significant progress has been made but improvement rate has reached another plateau in recent years. A study funded by the Construction Industry Institute has confirmed that most safety measures are effective and mature organizations have better performance (Rowlinson et al. 2009). Prescription by the Government and the Authority, and self-regulation by the organizations were effective to improve safety but it appears that the existing plateau one can only break through by a change in culture. ...
... Safety performance is not improved by adopting a single initiative; it is the combined weight of a series of planned and coordinated initiatives that leads to continuous improvement (Rowlinson et al., 2009). Thus, in our line of enquiry, we seek to inform the planning of safety management of construction projects, a strategic element in the array of safety initiatives available. ...
Article
Existing initiatives in the management of construction project safety are largely based on normative compliance and error prevention, a risk management approach. Although advantageous, these approaches are not wholly successful in further lowering accident rates. A major limitation lies with the approaches' lack of emphasis on the social and team processes inherent in construction project settings. We advance the enquiry by invoking the concept of social capital and project organisational processes, and their impacts on project safety performance. Because social capital is a primordial concept and affects project participants' interactions, its impact on project safety performance is hypothesised to be indirect, i.e. the impact of social capital on safety performance is mediated by organisational processes in adaptation and cooperation. A questionnaire survey was conducted within Hong Kong construction industry to test the hypotheses. 376 usable responses were received and used for analyses. The results reveal that, while the structural dimension is not significant, the mediational thesis is generally supported with the cognitive and relational dimensions affecting project participants' adaptation and cooperation, and the latter two processes affect safety performance. However, the cognitive dimension also directly affects safety performance. The implications of these results for project safety management are discussed.
... Construction Accident Rates and Safety Scheme(Rowlinson et al., 2009) ...
Chapter
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Recent developments in information technology, artificial intelligence, deep learning and related affordable technologies, such as wireless sensors, open-source software and web apps, have led to scientific breakthroughs in various fields, including the construction industry. In this chapter, we propose a new area of research, ‘construction safety informatics’ and introduce the idea that there have been three generations of construction safety informatics. We describe the progress of informatics, generally, in the modern era, and then its application in the construction industry. Its ontology concerning construction safety enhancement, management and data study is also reviewed. The results show that academia has mainly been concerned with the first generation of construction safety informatics which relied utterly on human control. Some researchers have started to look at the second generation, which encompasses the development of the Internet of Things (IoT) to communicate and generate the requisite data automatically. The construction industry, however, has gone one step further to develop a chatbot which can assist safety officers in filling out their safety reports.
Chapter
Given the very fact of rapid ageing of population and drastic decline in skilled and experienced construction workers, it is anticipated that the problem of shortage of construction workforce in Hong Kong will exacerbate in the coming decades. In order to alleviate the problem, the work proposed here aims at identifying the effective measures for extending the working lives of the construction workforce in Hong Kong by proposing a conceptual model for examining the influence of individual factors and work-related factors on work ability. A better understanding of the potential factors affecting the current and future work ability of construction workers will greatly assist the formulation of evidence based interventions to retaining the workforce in the Hong Kong construction industry.
Conference Paper
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An industry-wide agenda, aimed at achieving ZERO FATALITIES, is proposed for the Hong Kong construction industry based on the results of an industry wide research project. The agenda includes the rationale for promoting a culture change throughout the real estate and construction industry and a key element of this is the extension of the Pay for Safety System and a worker engagement initiative in health and safety management. Underpinning this is the elaboration of need to establish and achieve territory-wide safety targets which can be collaboratively set and which are measured in real-time with feedback which promotes organisational learning. These data need to be publically available and the use of proper, exhaustive and sound accident and incident investigation techniques is expounded. The underlying theme of the paper is that no improvement is possible without the adoption of integrated project delivery systems which facilitate the adoption of more relational and collaborative procurement which can be underpinned by the technology provided by BIM.
Chapter
The Hong Kong construction industry has been characterized by a stressful work environment together with a poor safety record. The construction professionals always have to face the immense pressure from the tight schedule. Job burnout is thus experienced by many who particularly work on site. There is a thinking that burnout experienced by these construction personnel could affect their safety performance. Working on a construction site is quite different from work carried out in a more stable environment such as an office. Long working hours, lack of job security, tight programme, multi-layer subcontract systems, dealing with numerous parties, environmental issues, the public reaction to accidents, etc. are typical stresses in construction in Hong Kong.