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Map showing supply of immigration and asylum legal aid lawyers in England and Wales as of 14/02/2019. (Source: Freedom of Information Request to Legal Aid Agency)

Map showing supply of immigration and asylum legal aid lawyers in England and Wales as of 14/02/2019. (Source: Freedom of Information Request to Legal Aid Agency)

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
Report on the supply side of the immigration and asylum legal aid market, based on case studies of peer-recognised high quality providers across the ranches of the legal profession in England and Wales - solicitors firms, not-for-profits and barristers. Investigates the relationships between quality, financial viability, client access, demand and s...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... the clients nor the lawyers involved in publicly funded asylum and immigration legal services receive unmitigated public sympathy, but it is firmly in the public interest to ensure that the systems in which they operate are effective. Figure 1 Legal aid supply map 9 Figure 2 The UK asylum procedure 10 Figure 3 Domestic appeals structure 11 Figure 4 The demand matrix 12 Figure 5 The demand matrix plus cost consequences 22 Box 1 Case study - asylum and trafficking case 23 Figure 6 Analysis of demand and costs in the Box 1 case study 24 Figure 7 Hourly rates for appeals work (CLR stage) for barristers 25 Figure 8 Illustrative fees for a barrister on hourly rates in a straightforward case 25 Figure 9 Peer review outcomes in civil and family law, 2017-18 35 Figure 10 Boom and bust cycle in the number of immigration legal aid providers 2004-2019 44 Figure 11 The Lawyer-Mediated Supply model 46 ...
Context 2
... the clients nor the lawyers involved in publicly funded asylum and immigration legal services receive unmitigated public sympathy, but it is firmly in the public interest to ensure that the systems in which they operate are effective. Figure 1 Legal aid supply map 9 Figure 2 The UK asylum procedure 10 Figure 3 Domestic appeals structure 11 Figure 4 The demand matrix 12 Figure 5 The demand matrix plus cost consequences 22 Box 1 Case study - asylum and trafficking case 23 Figure 6 Analysis of demand and costs in the Box 1 case study 24 Figure 7 Hourly rates for appeals work (CLR stage) for barristers 25 Figure 8 Illustrative fees for a barrister on hourly rates in a straightforward case 25 Figure 9 Peer review outcomes in civil and family law, 2017-18 35 Figure 10 Boom and bust cycle in the number of immigration legal aid providers 2004-2019 44 Figure 11 The Lawyer-Mediated Supply model 46 ...
Context 3
... the clients nor the lawyers involved in publicly funded asylum and immigration legal services receive unmitigated public sympathy, but it is firmly in the public interest to ensure that the systems in which they operate are effective. Figure 1 Legal aid supply map 9 Figure 2 The UK asylum procedure 10 Figure 3 Domestic appeals structure 11 Figure 4 The demand matrix 12 Figure 5 The demand matrix plus cost consequences 22 Box 1 Case study - asylum and trafficking case 23 Figure 6 Analysis of demand and costs in the Box 1 case study 24 Figure 7 Hourly rates for appeals work (CLR stage) for barristers 25 Figure 8 Illustrative fees for a barrister on hourly rates in a straightforward case 25 Figure 9 Peer review outcomes in civil and family law, 2017-18 35 Figure 10 Boom and bust cycle in the number of immigration legal aid providers 2004-2019 44 Figure 11 The Lawyer-Mediated Supply model 46 ...
Context 4
... at the time when Refugee and Migrant Justice went into administration, the Legal Services Commission stated that it had an over-supply of bids for the tender, meaning it gave only 100 matter starts each to most bidders. As the graph in Figure 10 shows ...
Context 5
... study suggests that in fact lawyers neither induce nor merely respond to demand but rather mediate it. The model in Figure 11 aims to help in understanding how they do so. The left-hand column includes, in broad terms, the drivers of potential-client demand for lawyers' services. ...

Citations

... Other times, being unrepresented may be the result of more than lacking funds. UK government legal aid for asylum is free, but only available to cases deemed to have over a 50% chance of success (for discussion of the UK's immigration legal aid market and the impact of austerity, see Wilding, 2019). Solicitors must decide whether they can win cases, and if they lose too many they may be barred from providing future government-funded legal aid. ...
Article
There is an absence of absence in legal geography and materialist studies of the law. Drawing on a multi‐sited ethnography of European asylum appeal hearings, this paper illustrates the importance of absences for a fully‐fledged materiality of legal events. We show how absent materials impact hearings, that non‐attending participants profoundly influence them, and that even when participants are physically present, they are often simultaneously absent in other, psychological registers. In so doing we demonstrate the importance and productivity of thinking not only about law's omnipresence but also the absences that shape the way law is experienced and practiced. We show that attending to the distribution of absence and presence at legal hearings is a way to critically engage with legal performance.
... There is also some evidence to suggest that provision does not match need in certain parts of the country (NACCOM & Refugee Action 2018). Gaps are evident in several areas of the country -effectively meaning that there are parts of the country that are "advice deserts" (Wilding 2019). This led one of Britain's most senior judges to argue that "our justice system has become unaffordable to most" (Lord Chief Justice Thomas of Cwmgiedd, result quoted in The Bach Commission on Access to Justice 2016), whilst a recent review by the Law Society stated that "[in] reality, the Government's reforms have resulted in vulnerable groups finding themselves excluded from free legal advice" (Law Society 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Britain’s asylum system fails the most vulnerable; it cannot ensure that people who are least able to protect themselves are provided with the legal assistance that they require to cope with the challenges with which they are inevitably faced. Against this background, the charity Refugee Action developed the Frontline Immigration Advice Programme (FIAP), a technology-supported capacity strengthening programme that aims to increase access to justice for those going through the asylum system in the UK. This paper is concerned with the design and implementation of the FIAP as a free digitally enabled programme that provides learning opportunities for organisations and frontline workers in the refugee sector and supports them in developing new forms of legal practice. It provides empirical data from interviews with members of staff from six participating organisations in the FIAP, and from Refugee Action and the Office of the UK’s Immigration Services Commissioner1 (n = 21). The paper adopts a view on social justice, which according to Fraser (2005) is understood as ‘parity of participation’. We draw on Fraser’s work, as well as work of other scholars such as Lambert (2018) and Hodgkinson-Williams and Trotter (2018) to explore the relationship between social justice and open education by taking into consideration the context within which organisations and professionals operate. The analysis highlights six dimensions for social justice approaches for professional learning as demonstrated through the case of the FIAP: i. deliberate iterative design; ii. access to provision; iii. flexibility of provision; iv. development of resources; v. support and vi. advancing knowledge and skills whilst adapting the workplace. All these dimensions are discussed in the paper in relation to the concept of openness and are critical in developing open socially just programmes that aim to change work practice and address the needs of the most vulnerable.
Article
This article examines how three spheres of hostility intersect to prevent effective access to justice for those living with insecure immigration status. The neoliberal governance model, the barren justice landscape and the hostile environment are supported by the cynical construction of the ‘fat cat’ lawyer and the toxic ‘folk devil’ narrative of the ‘bogus’ asylum seeker. To the extent that the judiciary have frustrated the more obvious, ideologically driven, attempts to restrict access to justice for migrants, the austerity predicated measures pursuant to the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO) have completely altered the legal landscape. The analysis is informed by the findings of the ‘Legal advice and support for persons with insecure status’ project (hereafter LAPIS) in Nottingham which explores the challenges faced by service providers and the lived experiences of those with insecurity of status. It is clear that access to justice is a passport to the realisation of other rights, yet participants struggled to access a remedy because legal advice is too often out of reach.