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Map outlining the boundaries of the Salish Sea (solid black line), from the mountain tops to the marine water, showing terrestrial topography, marine bathymetry, and the ''arbitrary'' international border (white-gray dotted line) separating the Puget Sound Basin (United States) to the south and the Georgia Basin (Canada) to the north.  

Map outlining the boundaries of the Salish Sea (solid black line), from the mountain tops to the marine water, showing terrestrial topography, marine bathymetry, and the ''arbitrary'' international border (white-gray dotted line) separating the Puget Sound Basin (United States) to the south and the Georgia Basin (Canada) to the north.  

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Article
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Like other coastal zones around the world, the inland sea ecosystem of Washington (USA) and British Columbia (Canada), an area known as the Salish Sea, is changing under pressure from a growing human population, conversion of native forest and shoreline habitat to urban development, toxic contamination of sediments and species, and overharvest of r...

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Context 1
... inland sea of Washington State (USA) and British Columbia (Canada) is recognized as an international treasure ( Fraser et al. 2006). Corresponding to the ancestral home of the Coast Salish people and often referred to as the Salish Sea ( Fraser et al. 2006), the ecosystem stretches from Olympia in the south to Campbell River in the north and extends from the crest of the surrounding mountain ranges (Olympic, Cascade, Vancouver Island, and Coast Range) to the deepest part of the marine waters ( Figure 1). The area south of the international border is called the Puget Sound Basin, and to the north, the Georgia Basin ( Figure 1). ...
Context 2
... to the ancestral home of the Coast Salish people and often referred to as the Salish Sea ( Fraser et al. 2006), the ecosystem stretches from Olympia in the south to Campbell River in the north and extends from the crest of the surrounding mountain ranges (Olympic, Cascade, Vancouver Island, and Coast Range) to the deepest part of the marine waters ( Figure 1). The area south of the international border is called the Puget Sound Basin, and to the north, the Georgia Basin ( Figure 1). Thousands of streams and rivers drain 7470 km of coastline into 16,925 square kilometers of marine water (1:250,000 scale World vector Shoreline and TEOPO2 topographic/ bathymetric GIS grid). ...
Context 3
... the connectivity and linkages between seemingly unrelated species and ecosystems is key to suc- cessful restoration. Like most ecosystems, the factors determining the fate of the Salish Sea extend hundreds of kilometers from the sea to the crest of the mountains that surround these waters ( Figure 1). For example, the amount and configuration of impervious surfaces (e.g., concrete parking lots, roads) and harvested forests impact the biotic integrity of streams feeding into the Salish Sea ( Alberti et al. 2007), which, in turn, affects the health of the entire ecosystem. ...

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