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Map of Ward 23 in Makoni District (Source: Drawn by Authors using QGIS v2.6.1). Figure 2 shows the location of Kawadza, Dumba and Nyatito villages in Ward 23 Makoni District. These villages use the dam for their irrigation agriculture, livestock rearing, domestic purposes, recreation and fishing activities and other livelihoods activities.The information was gathered using interviews, observations and focus group discussions. The method allowed the researcher to collect data on the natural setting of the communities. The method allowed people to express their beliefs, opinions and their feelings pertaining to the influence dam. The illiterate people of the community were also allowed to participate in the research and thus breaks the cross cutting issues which were likely to affect data collection. Hence using the research design, a sample size of 72 respondents using the simple random sampling method was used. The study targeted the adults both women, man, children and the elderly. Key informants from ZINWA, Dam officials, Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife management, clinic, Councilor, village heads were consulted first before consulting the villagers. Information from key informants helped in securing permission and authority, demarcating the study area boundary, gathering population disaggregated data, understanding the livelihoods and nature of development in the area. The research design had an advantage of gathering relatively large number of cases at a particular time and also the fact that it is cross sectional was also another advantage. 

Map of Ward 23 in Makoni District (Source: Drawn by Authors using QGIS v2.6.1). Figure 2 shows the location of Kawadza, Dumba and Nyatito villages in Ward 23 Makoni District. These villages use the dam for their irrigation agriculture, livestock rearing, domestic purposes, recreation and fishing activities and other livelihoods activities.The information was gathered using interviews, observations and focus group discussions. The method allowed the researcher to collect data on the natural setting of the communities. The method allowed people to express their beliefs, opinions and their feelings pertaining to the influence dam. The illiterate people of the community were also allowed to participate in the research and thus breaks the cross cutting issues which were likely to affect data collection. Hence using the research design, a sample size of 72 respondents using the simple random sampling method was used. The study targeted the adults both women, man, children and the elderly. Key informants from ZINWA, Dam officials, Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife management, clinic, Councilor, village heads were consulted first before consulting the villagers. Information from key informants helped in securing permission and authority, demarcating the study area boundary, gathering population disaggregated data, understanding the livelihoods and nature of development in the area. The research design had an advantage of gathering relatively large number of cases at a particular time and also the fact that it is cross sectional was also another advantage. 

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Article
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The study aimed at empirically investigating the influence of Osborne dam on the socioeconomic development of ward 23, Makoni District. The research was carried out in three villages Kawadza, Nyatito and Dumba, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Questionnaire, interviews guide, focus group discussion (FGD) and an observation guide wer...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... dam is located on the Nyatande and Odzi confluence and it stretches 16 kilometers up the Odzi River and fifteen kilometers along Nyatande tributary. The dam is over a kilometer wide and sixty-six meters deep (Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management, 2005 Figure 2 shows the location of Kawadza, Dumba and Nyatito villages in Ward 23 Makoni District. These villages use the dam for their irrigation agriculture, livestock rearing, domestic purposes, recreation and fishing activities and other livelihoods activities.The information was gathered using interviews, observations and focus group discussions. ...

Citations

... In Chingwizi, the MLGPW built five schools, two clinics and 63 boreholes only after the arrival of the IDPs to the resettlement sites (HRW, 2015), leaving a considerable shortfall from the initially planned development. Previous dam related displacements in the country show that once the state relocates IDPs, its support dwindles, as documented by Makururu et al. (2018) with respect to the state's withdrawal from displaced communities in Eastern Zimbabwe after the Osborne dam construction. Almost 30 years after the dam's completion, the resettlement area still lacks physical infrastructure like irrigation pipes, canals, schools and clinics (ibid). ...
Article
Full-text available
Forced displacement and resettlement is a pervasive challenge being contemplated across the social sciences. Scholarly literature, however, often fails to engage complexities of power in understanding socio-environmental interactions in resettlement processes. Addressing Zimbabwe’s Tokwe-Mukosi flood disaster resettlement, we explore hegemonic uses of state power during the pre- and post-flood induced resettlement processes. We examine how state power exercised through local government, financial, and security institutions impacts community vulnerabilities during forced resettlement processes, while furthering capitalist agendas, drawing insights from analysing narratives between 2010 and 2021. Concerns abound that multiple ministries, the police, and the army undermined displaced people’s resilience, including through inadequate compensation, with state institutions neglecting displaced communities during encampment by inadequately meeting physical security, health, educational, and livestock production needs. We explore how forcibly resettling encamped households to a disputed location is not only an ongoing perceived injustice regionally but also a continuing reference point in resettlement discussions countrywide, reflecting concerns that land use and economic reconfigurations in resettlement can undermine subsistence livelihoods while privileging certain values and interests over others. Policy lessons highlight the need for reviewing disaster management legislation, developing compensation guidelines and reviewing encampment practices. Analytically, lessons point to how state power may be studied in relation to perspectives on the destruction of flood survivors’ connections to place, people and livelihoods, underscoring the critical need for theorising the relationships between power dynamics and diverse experiences around displacement.