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Map of Uganda Showing Major Lakes, Rivers and Regions of the Country (2) . 

Map of Uganda Showing Major Lakes, Rivers and Regions of the Country (2) . 

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Providing sources of sustainable and quality potable water in Uganda is a significant public health issue. This project aimed at identifying and prioritizing possible actions on how sustainable high quality potable water in Uganda’s water supply systems could be achieved. In that respect, a review of both the current water supply systems and govern...

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... the existence of a vast number of lakes (about 27 in total), rivers and streams ( Figure 1 ), Uganda continues to face the issue of limited accessibility to potable water, par- ticularly in rural and poor urban communities. Uganda ' s surface water sources cover 15.4% of the total land area (236,040 km 2 ) and these provide domestic water supply to both urban and rural populations (3) . ...

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This article investigates the reasons householders do, and don’t, adopt domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH). Using a mixed-methods research approach, we collected data in three districts in central Uganda. Factors that emerged as important with respect to uptake of DWRH to address water shortage, especially at the household scale, include the work of intermediary organizations, finance mechanisms, life course dynamics and land tenure. © 2018, © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
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