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Map of South America showing the localities sampled by the SARCE network (South American Research Group in Coastal Ecosystems) in the Caribbean Sea, and in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.  

Map of South America showing the localities sampled by the SARCE network (South American Research Group in Coastal Ecosystems) in the Caribbean Sea, and in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.  

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Marine Benthos: Biology, Ecosystem Functions and Environmental Impact is a book dedicated to show a series of case studies about how benthic habitats are organized and how they function as a tool for any environmental impact studies. The present book documents how the natural condition of these communities is and aims to expand our present knowledg...

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... main goals of SARCE are to: (1) Test hypotheses about latitudinal gradients and patterns of local and regional biodiversity, (2) Identify the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, (3) Assess the effect of environmental gradients and anthropogenic stressors, (4) Carry out capacity building and training activities aimed to solve environmental problems for societal benefit. The SARCE network includes more than 30 researchers from 9 South American coastal countries and has sampled with a standardized protocol in more than 150 sites around the continent (Figure 1). In this chapter we provide a description of the biodiversity of the sites sampled with the SARCE protocol (http://sarce.cbm.usb.ve/for-scientists/), ...

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Given the complexity of current environmental challenges, such as climate change and biodiversity conservation and governance, the interdisciplinary approach to science has gained increased awareness and use in the global scientific community. Similarly, ocean sustainability is a topic of concern, often voiced in international fora. These discussions emphasize the need to promote ocean governance, coupled with a greater understanding of oceanographic processes. Ocean science, however, is still fragmented and many scientists lack adequate training to understand and implement interdisciplinary and integrated approaches to their research in a manner that supports decision-making. This book describes the São Paulo School of Advanced Science on Ocean Interdisciplinary Research and Governance (SPSAS Ocean), which aimed at supporting short courses on themes concerning the frontier of science, that are the subject of internationally competitive research being carried out in the state of São Paulo, and was sponsored by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP). The course was organized around three major themes on ocean research: 1) Setting the context: theory and historical background; 2) Sharing the advances in ocean sciences: processes and connections; and 3) Integrating science and public policies. The two-week course included theory classes, work in groups, poster sessions, science-policy discussions, and a field trip to Baixada Santista, located in the central coast of the state of São Paulo. This book is one of the results of the exciting process promoted by SPSAS Ocean. It presents essays produced by some of the SPSAS participants on a variety of themes that are relevant to the transformation of socio-ecological systems and the relationship between ocean and society.