Fig 1 - uploaded by Udo Michael Nehren
Content may be subject to copyright.
Map of Rio de Janeiro state with main land use/cover and conservation units. 

Map of Rio de Janeiro state with main land use/cover and conservation units. 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
The Atlantic Forest of Rio de Janeiro state has been pushed back by agricultural and infrastructural devel-opment, so that formerly contiguous forests were divided into numerous fragments. Deforestation and forest degradation have been accompanied by land degradation, which is reflected in the loss of habitats and biodiversity, in soil erosion and...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... growth, contiguous Atlantic Forest in the central parts of the Serra dos Órgãos (part of the Serra do Mar mountain range) of RJ (see Fig. 1) harbors an exceptionally high structural and taxonomic diversity of plant species ( Stehmann et al. 2009). In contrast, forest fragments in the agricultural landscape are dominated by a small set of early to mid-successional tree species representing a quasi-inal successional stage of secondary forests (Joly et al. 2014, hier & Wesenberg 2016. Additionally, edge-efects resulting from the patchy spatial distri- bution of forest fragments trigger changes in microclimatic and structural conditions, caus- ing e.g. enhanced tree damage and mortality, reduced seed recruitment and establishment and dominance of species adapted to disturbance ( Oliveira et al. 2004). Such loristic and structural transitions in fragmented forests promote biodiversity erosion through homogeni- zation, where a few functionally adapted winners replace many specialist losers (McKinney & Lookwood 1999, Tabarelli et al. 2012). Moreover, above ground biomass (AGB) and related carbon stocks are signiicantly lower in forest fragments ( Alves et al. 2010, Lindner & Sattler 2012, especially due to the lack of big trees (DBH > 30cm) which make up to 70 % of old growth forests AGB (Lindner 2010). Such big trees are of high economic value and thus subject to selective logging, facilitated by forest fragments close proximity to settlements and roads and related easy access ( Liu & Slik ...
Context 2
... exploitation and overuse of natural resources as well as inadequate modern land management have left their mark on the landscape of rural RJ. However, compared to other states of the Atlantic Forest biome the proportion of forest cover in RJ is rather high, as large parts of the Serra do Mar mountain range, which crosses the state in NE-SW direction parallel to the Atlantic Ocean, are still forested and protected under various conservation categories (Fig 1). According to Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica and INPE (2017), in 2016 18.7 % of RJ was covered with Atlantic Forest; together with smaller patches of mangroves, restingas, and other vegetation types, 20.9 % of the state territory was classiied as "natural" ecosystems. he proportion of the current compared to the original forest cover was esti- mated at 30.7 %. Current deforestation rates are 37 ha in the period 2015-2016 and 127 ha for the past ive years. his is low compared to the periods of high deforestation from the mid-1980s to the late-2000s, where a total area of about 177,000 ha was deforested within only 35 years with a peak of 140,372 ha between 1990 and ...
Context 3
... growth, contiguous Atlantic Forest in the central parts of the Serra dos Órgãos (part of the Serra do Mar mountain range) of RJ (see Fig. 1) harbors an exceptionally high structural and taxonomic diversity of plant species ( Stehmann et al. 2009). In contrast, forest fragments in the agricultural landscape are dominated by a small set of early to mid-successional tree species representing a quasi-inal successional stage of secondary forests (Joly et al. 2014, hier & Wesenberg 2016. Additionally, edge-efects resulting from the patchy spatial distri- bution of forest fragments trigger changes in microclimatic and structural conditions, caus- ing e.g. enhanced tree damage and mortality, reduced seed recruitment and establishment and dominance of species adapted to disturbance ( Oliveira et al. 2004). Such loristic and structural transitions in fragmented forests promote biodiversity erosion through homogeni- zation, where a few functionally adapted winners replace many specialist losers (McKinney & Lookwood 1999, Tabarelli et al. 2012). Moreover, above ground biomass (AGB) and related carbon stocks are signiicantly lower in forest fragments ( Alves et al. 2010, Lindner & Sattler 2012, especially due to the lack of big trees (DBH > 30cm) which make up to 70 % of old growth forests AGB (Lindner 2010). Such big trees are of high economic value and thus subject to selective logging, facilitated by forest fragments close proximity to settlements and roads and related easy access ( Liu & Slik ...
Context 4
... exploitation and overuse of natural resources as well as inadequate modern land management have left their mark on the landscape of rural RJ. However, compared to other states of the Atlantic Forest biome the proportion of forest cover in RJ is rather high, as large parts of the Serra do Mar mountain range, which crosses the state in NE-SW direction parallel to the Atlantic Ocean, are still forested and protected under various conservation categories (Fig 1). According to Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica and INPE (2017), in 2016 18.7 % of RJ was covered with Atlantic Forest; together with smaller patches of mangroves, restingas, and other vegetation types, 20.9 % of the state territory was classiied as "natural" ecosystems. he proportion of the current compared to the original forest cover was esti- mated at 30.7 %. Current deforestation rates are 37 ha in the period 2015-2016 and 127 ha for the past ive years. his is low compared to the periods of high deforestation from the mid-1980s to the late-2000s, where a total area of about 177,000 ha was deforested within only 35 years with a peak of 140,372 ha between 1990 and ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary The Amazon region is a globally important biodiversity hotspot and carbon reservoir. In the context of increasing deforestation in the Amazon, high‐resolution satellite monitoring is essential for detecting small spatially fragmented fires and for developing more targeted forest conservation strategies. Here, we compiled a hi...