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Map of PFV as a vector 53

Map of PFV as a vector 53

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The present paper studies the semantics of the so-called perfective (PFV) form in Arusa (Maasai), using the model of the dynamic (one- and two-dimensional) semantic maps. The analysis demonstrates that PFV is a broad, semi-advanced resultative-path gram. It spans large sections of the two sub-paths of the resultative path: the anterior path (presen...

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... Arusa is a heavily under-researched variety of Maasai. The entire collection of scholarly literature on Arusa is limited to four publications: a PhD dissertation dedicated to phonology and morpho-phonology presented by Levergood in 1987; an MA thesis dedicated to the morpho-semantics of the verbal system written by Karani in 2013; and, more recently, two papers published by the authors of the present article, of which one deals with the tense, aspect, mood (TAM) semantics of the so-called perfective form (Andrason and Karani 2017a), and the other analyzes the phenomenon of left dislocation (Andrason and Karani 2017b). ...
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... In addition, a group of morphologically irregular verbs expresses the perfective aspect by suppletion, for example, ee 'he will die' etwa 'he died' (see Koopman 2001 for related discussion on the Kisongo dialect). Andrason and Karani (2017b) present pertinent discussion on aspect in Arusa. ...
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... However, in some contexts, the imperfective occurs referring to the past if the event denoted by the verb was happening at the time that another event was happening (see Andrason and Karani 2017b for discussion on the perfective aspect in Arusa, a dialect of Maa). The following examples in (34) illustrate the interpretations of the three viewpoints that obtain in the reciprocal verb construction in the imperfective aspect. ...
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