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1. Map of Goa: old and new Conquests. From Hall 1992: 14.  

1. Map of Goa: old and new Conquests. From Hall 1992: 14.  

Context in source publication

Context 1
... indications showed that, in the heated debates dealing with this communal violence and the rise of the Hindutva movement egging it on, the longstanding peaceful coexistence of Hindus and Catholics in Goa gained a particular public appeal. Hence, newspapers in Goa praised the region as a paradise of communal harmony by publishing articles with headlines such as "Zagor: rising above reli- gion" (Gomes and shirodkar 1991), "a Common Faith" (d'souza 1993), or "sisters of Harmony" (de souza and d 'souza 1987), which appreciatively highlighted the syncretistic practices in the local Jagar festivals and celebrated the cross-religious worship dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the Hindu devi. in the aftermath of the violence, Hindu-Catholic syncretism found a widely positive echo in Goa's public discourse and regularly showed up in the rhetoric of local politicians, in- tellectual discussions, and events organized by cultural institutions such as Kala academy, presenting Goa as a prime example of india's secularism, that is, the harmonious coexistence of diverse religious doctrines and communities. Even in Goa, however, the coexistence of Hindus and Catholics was not untouched by the spreading Hindu nationalism and strife over Hindutva. ...

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