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Mantis shrimp surgical and recording restraints. a) a large mantis shrimp (Squilla empusa) in restraint during surgery. The stereotaxic apparatus tilts the animal into a pool of water, allowing it to breath, while minimizing movement. b) Close-up of placement of the backpack with dental cement and placement of wires in merus. c) Small mantis shrimp (Gonodactylus smithii) in restraint during experimentation with callouts highlighting anatomical features: i Telson. ii Pleopods. iii Merus. The extensor muscle is shown in below the cuticle in green and the flexor muscle is shown in red. iv Antennal scale. v Carapace with backpack and ground. d) Photo of experimental setup with callouts highlighting individual parts: i Cloth restraint. ii Dental cement encasing the backpack with wires going below the water into the merus. iii The plug connected to the backpack with wires. iv Marked with black and white arrowheads, these callouts demonstrate that the water covers most of the dorsal surface of the animal, leaving only the backpack dry. Note that only the pleopods need to be submerged.

Mantis shrimp surgical and recording restraints. a) a large mantis shrimp (Squilla empusa) in restraint during surgery. The stereotaxic apparatus tilts the animal into a pool of water, allowing it to breath, while minimizing movement. b) Close-up of placement of the backpack with dental cement and placement of wires in merus. c) Small mantis shrimp (Gonodactylus smithii) in restraint during experimentation with callouts highlighting anatomical features: i Telson. ii Pleopods. iii Merus. The extensor muscle is shown in below the cuticle in green and the flexor muscle is shown in red. iv Antennal scale. v Carapace with backpack and ground. d) Photo of experimental setup with callouts highlighting individual parts: i Cloth restraint. ii Dental cement encasing the backpack with wires going below the water into the merus. iii The plug connected to the backpack with wires. iv Marked with black and white arrowheads, these callouts demonstrate that the water covers most of the dorsal surface of the animal, leaving only the backpack dry. Note that only the pleopods need to be submerged.

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
Mantis shrimp are aggressive, burrowing crustaceans that hunt using one the fastest movements in the natural world. These stomatopods can crack the calcified shells of prey or spear down unsuspecting fish with lighting speed. Their strike makes use of power-amplification mechanisms to move their limbs much faster than is possible by muscles alone....

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... the surgery, the animal is restrained on a stereotax (Figure 2a) with at least one degree of freedom, allowing the slab to be tipped downward into a shallow pool of water. ...
Context 2
... large mantis shrimp, at least three points along the body need to be restrained: below the carapace, in the middle of the abdominal region, and at the bottom of the abdominal segment, above the uropods. These points of restraint can be held with either pipe cleaners or jumper wires, inserted in the Styrofoam glued to the bottom of the slab (Figure 2a). ...
Context 3
... silly putty will hold the animal in this angled position. Again, at least three points along the body are restrained with pipe cleaners/jumper wires inserted in Styrofoam (Figure 2a). Once restrained, dip the slab into a shallow pool of water so that the mantis shrimp's pleopods are mostly immersed in aerated water. ...
Context 4
... two pairs of forceps in each hand, make a millimeter-long bend "anchor" in the silver wire ground, which should be the most medial lead (Figure 2b). This anchor ensures the ground will stay in the tissue. ...
Context 5
... the backpack plug to channel 1 on the Muscle SpikerBox Pro and the hydrophone to channel 2. EMG and audio data are acquired with SpikeRecorder, an opensource desktop app for Windows, MacOS, and Linux (Backyard Brains, Ann Arbor, MI). To make the mantis shrimp's restraint, cut a strip of fabric, 2" long, 0.5" wide, with a notch in the middle, and wrap it around the mantis shrimp (Figure 2c,d). For a large animal, the restraint should be bigger: 3" long, 1" wide. ...
Context 6
... anesthetized animal's anterior abdomen should be wrapped such that the legs are pointing away from the merus and clamped using a helping hands tool. Lower the restrained animal into an aerated salt water bath with its pleopods in the water and the carapace out of the water (Figure 2c,d). ...

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Article
Full-text available
Mantis shrimp are aggressive, burrowing crustaceans that hunt using one the fastest movements in the natural world. These stomatopods can crack the calcified shells of prey or spear down unsuspecting fish with lighting speed. Their strike makes use of power-amplification mechanisms to move their limbs much faster than is possible by muscles alone....