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Management goals for stakeholder engagement. Adapted from [50].

Management goals for stakeholder engagement. Adapted from [50].

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Developing urban and peri-urban ecosystem services with nature-based solutions (NBS) and participatory approaches can help achieve more resilient and sustainable environments for cities and urban areas in the face of climate change. The co-creation process is increasingly recognised as the way forward to deal with environmental issues in cities, al...

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Context 1
... that stakeholder engagement is usually a complicated and messy process, tainted with conflict, disagreement and diverging points of view [50], the goals of the engagement process should be clear from the beginning. The most common goals are shown in Figure 5. To promote the engagement of stakeholders and to achieve the management goals mentioned above, different strategies, methods and tools have been designed and implemented specifically for participatory processes. ...
Context 2
... aim of the latter is to support the development of ULL for co-creation and experimentation of NBS as well as to collect methods, tools and techniques for stakeholder engagement. Some of the methods and tools found in the toolkits mentioned above, as well as the main goals for stakeholder engagement (see Figure 5), were used to identify the methods and tools that can be used in each of the stages and substages of the LCCCP. ...

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... Nature-based adaptation strategies such as EBA, when combined with participatory approaches can provide a unique and innovative model for climate adaptation. However, their implementation has been limited due to a lack of understanding of the interaction between EBA and participatory approaches [4][5][6]. Several European Union (EU) projects, including OPERANDUM, RECONECT, GREEN SURGE and NAIAD [7][8][9][10] amongst others, have started analyzing the role of EBA in climate adaptation using the living lab (LL) approach, but pertinent research gaps are yet to be addressed [11]. ...
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Nature-based solutions (NBS) implementation in urban contexts has proven outcoming multiple benefits to reverse the current trend of natural resources' degradation adversely affecting biodiversity, human health, and wellbeing. Yet, the current urban-planning policy frameworks present a rigid structure to integrate NBS definitions, and their co-benefits to get mainstreamed and up scaled on a wider urban spatial dimension. In this research, we test a complete co-creation pathway that encourages decision-makers to embed citizen engagement methodologies as an approach to co-design and co-implement NBS in shared-governance processes aiming to increment the greening of urban spaces, towards more inclusive and climate resilient cities. On one hand, we assess a tendency to involve a multiplicity of stake-holders that collaborate to the establishment of an Urban Innovation Partnership (UIP) aiming at increasing the social awareness around NBS themes, and at the same time tackling both financial and governance aspects. On the other hand, the innovation embedded in NBS paves the way to combine a multi-scalar flexibility in implementation tools and place-based urban actions, hence resulting in widespread economic, environmental, and social impacts in place. The novelty in embedding the co-creation process in urban-planning practice lies in catalyzing resources towards the transposition of research into practice through policy and planning tools for local authorities and decision-makers. Three front-runner cities (Hamburg, London, and Milan) are under investigation as part of Clever Cities-a Horizon 2020 project-aiming at implementing NBS in diverse urban-regeneration processes, through nine up-running Urban Living Labs (ULLs). Grounded on a comparative analysis of these three cities, key characterization for NBS implementation framework could be categorized into: (1) current urban-planning greening strategies in each context, (2) specific environmental and societal challenges addressed, (3) different typologies and scales of NBS integration within urban morphologies, (4) specific governance 259 260 I. Mahmoud and E. Morello process as response to co-design and co-implementation processes, and (5) availability of financial investment and main stakeholders. As research results, we emphasize using co-creation approach in urban planning to embed and upscale NBS in an inclusive shared-governance process, hence contributing to social awareness and acceptance. Meanwhile, spatial, and financial challenges could be majorly resolved using a multi-scalar approach to manage newly embedded urban-greening policies at the urban level. Lastly, the implementation scale of NBS with local communities requires a radical paradigmatic shift in societal, individual and administrative urban-planning practices.
... Co-creation is not a novel concept; however, incorporating co-creation in CALs to implement NBS required a solid initiative from the three city authorities for getting accustomed to a shared-governance approach based on open participation and citizen empowerment. Accordingly, the novelty in applying co-creation in urban-greening projects has a threefold aim: firstly, to enhance the awareness and knowledge of citizens and stakeholders around NBS and their co-benefits; secondly, to enhance inclusivity in decision-making for urban transformation, hence, accelerating the need for capacity building in public administration towards an effective shared governance; and thirdly, to achieve a better quality of the regeneration interventions, emerging as the results of site-specific processes that build on the continuous improvement cycles and design-thinking stages during the various co-creation phases (DeLosRíos-White et al. 2020). ...
Book
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This open access book offers a selection of research papers and case studies presented at the 3rd international conference “Smart and Sustainable Planning for Cities and Regions”, held in December 2019 in Bolzano, Italy, and explores the concept of smart and sustainable planning, including top contributions from academics, policy makers, consultants and other professionals. Innovation processes such as co-design and co-creation help establish collaborations that engage with stakeholders in a trustworthy and transparent environment while answering the need for new value propositions. The importance of an integrated, holistic approach is widely recognized to break down silos in local government, in particular, when aimed at achieving a better integration of climate-energy planning. Despite the ongoing urbanization and polarization processes, new synergies between urban and rural areas emerge, linking development opportunities to intrinsic cultural, natural and man-made landscape values. The increasing availability of big, real-time urban data and advanced ICT facilitates frequent assessment and continuous monitoring of performances, while allowing fine-tuning as needed. This is valid not only for individual projects but also on a wider scale. In addition, and circling back to the first point, (big) urban data and ICT can be of enormous help in facilitating engagement and co-creation by raising awareness and by providing insight into the local consequences of specific plans. However, this potential is not yet fully exploited in standard processes and procedures, which can therefore lack the agility and flexibility to keep up with the pulse of the city and dynamics of society. The book provides a multi-disciplinary outlook based on experience to orient the reader in the giant galaxy of smart and sustainable planning, support the transposition of research into practice, scale up visionary approaches and design groundbreaking planning policies and tools.
Conference Paper
The world is facing numerous environmental challenges due to global change. These come in the form of air and water pollution, heat islands, floods, sprawl and gentrification issues, which stand as threats to citizen health, predominantly in urbanized areas, where most of the population is concentrated. It is now more than ever necessary to provide relevant information and help decision makers adopt measures for a green transition, which can be achieved by implementing nature-based solutions (NBS). The systemic decision support tool (SDST) and associated NBS simulation visualization tool (NBS-SVT) is a two-part online application that stores and manages technical multi-disciplinary data models concerning urban heat, air quality, flooding, and sprawl, gentrification and real-estate valuation, displaying them in the form of interactive and easy to digest geographical information. The application aims to help co-creation processes and decision making by showing the results of urban simulations with no action compared to NBS implementation across different climate scenarios. The aim of this paper is to present the SDST/NBS-SVT, explain its functioning and structure, as well as its capabilities for use in informed co-creation processes. The SDST/NBS-SVT has already been used in a number of workshops and online sessions, proving its potential as a means to transmit technical information in an easily understandable manner that can reach audiences with any level of technical knowledge.KeywordsDecision supportOnline applicationNature-based solutionsDecision makingCo-creationSimulation