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Male and female genitalia of Oeneis tanana from 5 mi. S of Tok, Alaska: a, male genitalia (SN-15-156) in left lateral view; b, aedeagus in left lateral view; c, aedeagus in dorsal view; d, eighth tergite in dorsal view; e, juxta in dorsal view; f, female genitalia (SN-15-151) in dorsal view; g, lamella antevaginalis in front view; h, signa. Illustrations by Shinichi Nakahara. Scale bar = 1 mm.

Male and female genitalia of Oeneis tanana from 5 mi. S of Tok, Alaska: a, male genitalia (SN-15-156) in left lateral view; b, aedeagus in left lateral view; c, aedeagus in dorsal view; d, eighth tergite in dorsal view; e, juxta in dorsal view; f, female genitalia (SN-15-151) in dorsal view; g, lamella antevaginalis in front view; h, signa. Illustrations by Shinichi Nakahara. Scale bar = 1 mm.

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Oeneis tanana A. Warren & Nakahara is described from the Tanana River Basin in southeastern Alaska, USA. This new taxon belongs to the bore group of Oeneis Hübner, [1819] and is apparently closest to O. chryxus (E. Doubleday, [1849]) by morphology, including its larger size and similarity of the female genitalia. In wing patterns and COI mitochondr...

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... There are over 30 species in the genus Oeneis (Kleckova et al. 2015) and about one-third of them can be found in Northern China (Lukhtanov and Eitschberger 2000;Wu and Hsu 2017). The species in Oeneis share similar appearance and ecological environments (Kleckova et al. 2015) although the species boundaries and evolutionary relationships among closely related species remain poorly defined (Kim et al. 2013;Warren et al. 2016). Compared with the limited number of short mitochondrial or nuclear markers, whole mitogenomes possess relatively rich genetic information and have provided further resolution for phylogenetic relationships especially within closely related species (Qin et al. 2015;Sullivan et al. 2017). ...
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Oeneis urda (Eversmann, 1847) is a butterfly of the Satyrinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and a member of the Arctics, which are distributed in the arctic, subarctic, or high-altitude alpine regions. Here, we present the complete mitochondrial genome of O. urda assembled from next-generation sequencing data. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of O. urda is a circular molecule of 15,248 bp and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and one control region. Phylogenetic analysis using whole mitogenomic data of 23 satyrid butterflies strongly supports that the genus Oeneis has a close relationship with Davidina.
... As in other insect groups, the state of taxonomic knowledge of Canada's Lepidoptera fauna varies according to group. Butterflies are the best-known insect group taxonomically, and the few recent discoveries involve previously overlooked cryptic species (e.g., Verhulst 2009, Warren et al. 2016. Most faunal additions result from better resolution of species-groups that have traditionally been difficult to delineate, such as Coenonympha nipisiquit McDunnough (Sei and Porter 2007). ...
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