Male and female cadet SJA Brigade membership (in 000s). Statistics taken from MOSJ: Order of St John, Annual Reports, 1910-1990. Statistics are for England, Wales, Ireland and Northern Ireland up until 1945, and for England, Wales and Northern Ireland after this date.

Male and female cadet SJA Brigade membership (in 000s). Statistics taken from MOSJ: Order of St John, Annual Reports, 1910-1990. Statistics are for England, Wales, Ireland and Northern Ireland up until 1945, and for England, Wales and Northern Ireland after this date.

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First aid was the focus of growing voluntary activity in the post-war decades. Despite the advent of the National Health Service in 1948, increased numbers of people volunteered to learn, teach, and administer first aid as concern about health and safety infiltrated new activities and arenas. In this article we use the example of the Voluntary Aid...

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Context 1
... In this spirit, the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 stipulated only that employers should make provision for first aid based on their own risk assessments and did not specify precise numbers of first aiders (though later government literature did come with suggestions about numbers). 36 Despite this shift in regulatory philosophy, the number of certificates awarded by SJA reached its peacetime peak in the later 1970s, this against a backdrop of intensified competition from private training providers catering for the occupational first-aid market (see Figure 4) . But the demand for first-aid training was broader than just the workplace. ...
Context 2
... the cadet divisions, the feminization of the SJA was more marked. From a position of approximate parity between nursing (female) and ambulance (male) cadet numbers before the Second World War, nursing cadet numbers exceeded ambulance cadet numbers in 1942 and soared far above them thereafter (see Figure 4). This may in part have been due to the greater opportunities for a career in nursing with the expansion of employment in the NHS across the post-war decades. ...
Context 3
... Indeed, one SJA member recalled that a division she joined in the 1970s was effectively 'a social club'. 113 Figure 4 shows the rise of girls' (age: 11-18 years) involvement in SJA during the post-war period. It appears that the chance to acquire, and to exercise, first-aid expertise could be valuable to this group, since learning first aid as a member of a VAS could be a step towards a career in the NHS. ...

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