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Main constituent parts of Person-Object-Theory of Interest (POI)

Main constituent parts of Person-Object-Theory of Interest (POI)

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It is a well-studied phenomenon, that throughout the course of studying at university, the motivation for the study program decreases. Correlation between motivation and learners’ behaviour, for example the learning process, achievement or, in the worst case, dropout exist. So there is a need for understanding the development of motivation in detai...

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... 2006). Today, one way to depict interest describes it as a special interaction with the environment, either a Person-Object-Interaction (leading to the development of "individual interest") or a Person-Stimulus-Interaction (leading to "situational interest") (Krapp, 2007). This approach is called PersonObject-Theory (POI) and is visualized in Fig. 1. Its assumptions are on the one hand that individual interest is a person's characteristic and conceptualized as a stable personal disposition, and on the other hand that situational interest is based on interesting stimuli described as a momentary specific motivational/psychological state or object within a person. Both types of ...

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When a student is asked to perform a given task, her subjective estimate of the difficulty of that task has a strong influence on her performance. There exists a rich literature on the impact of perceived task difficulty on performance and motivation. Yet, there is another topic that is closely related to the subject of the influence of perceived t...

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... Third, in terms of student motivation, it has been shown that there is a clear relationship between this variable and university dropout cross-culturally, obtaining the same clear positive tie between high motivation and a lower probability of university dropout in different countries and diverse cultural settings [65][66][67][68][69][70][71][72][73]. In fact, a correlation has been found between motivation and positive behavior of students, as well as favorable involvement in the learning process and academic achievement [7,46,[74][75][76][77][78][79][80][81], in such a way that the most motivated students show less disruptive and/or challenging behavior, greater commitment to the learning process, and higher probabilities of achieving academic achievement. In the same way, recent studies have shown that the predictive value of motivation with respect to the probability of dropping out is clear, revealing that students with greater motivation are more resistant to the problem of dropping out, showing greater probabilities of completing the academic year [7,82,83]. ...
... In fact, a correlation has been found between motivation and positive behavior of students, as well as favorable involvement in the learning process and academic achievement [7,46,[74][75][76][77][78][79][80][81], in such a way that the most motivated students show less disruptive and/or challenging behavior, greater commitment to the learning process, and higher probabilities of achieving academic achievement. In the same way, recent studies have shown that the predictive value of motivation with respect to the probability of dropping out is clear, revealing that students with greater motivation are more resistant to the problem of dropping out, showing greater probabilities of completing the academic year [7,82,83]. ...
... This finding is consistent with that obtained by other recent studies since it has been shown that the persistence and university dropout of university students depends on a combination of individual, institutional, and economic factors, whose effects on the decision to drop out are mediated by the student's ability to successfully integrate into the academic system [1]. In addition, beyond the situation of vulnerability or social exclusion present in university students, other variables have been detected, such as motivation, which plays a key predictive role in the academic achievement of students [7,68,70,73,143], thus preventing dropout or failure and empowering the students to overcome difficulties, even when starting from disadvantaged social situations. ...
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