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En las puertas de la cuarta revolución industrial, se exige de una empresa competitiva. Para ello, se debe contar con un sistema de producción que cumpla con los pedidos y la demanda de los clientes. Este artículo se realizó en una empresa Textil de Imbabura, Ecuador. El presente trabajo investigativo tiene como objetivo planificar la producción a...
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Smart nanotextiles are an enabler for a variety of technological advances—industry 4.0, the Internet of things or a more sustainable fashion industry, for instance. The market for nanomaterials is expected to grow from US$5.1 billion in 2019 to US$14.8 billion by 2024. Due to the massive and ubiquitous use of nanomaterials, humans come in close contact with the materials and are exposed to a variety of chemicals and nanomaterials. The materials leak into nature, in every step of the life cycle of the product and accumulate in nature, the food chain, and in humans. The growing market is a chance for companies to deliver innovative products. However, long-term effects are not sufficiently investigated yet, which could lead to a backlash and pose a critical financial and reputational risk for companies and founders. That is why it is of great importance to design products with human health and environmental impacts in mind and implement an appropriate risk assessment in the product development process. To transform the linear fast fashion industry into a more sustainable and circular one, different concepts, tools, and design approaches along the life cycle are investigated and described in this chapter. Finally real life examples are provided to emphasize the practicability of phasing out substances of concern, using new design approaches and producing cost-effective sustainable textiles.