Loading strain rates and detailed specifications of AS4/PEEK composite laminates specimens.

Loading strain rates and detailed specifications of AS4/PEEK composite laminates specimens.

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The dynamic mechanical behavior of thermoplastic composites over a wide range of strain rates has become an important research topic for extreme environmental survivability in the fields of military protection, aircraft safety, and aerospace engineering. However, the dynamic compression response in the out-of-plane direction, which is one of the mo...

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... Owing to their superior features, such as high specific strength and stiffness, high specific moduli, damage tolerance, and environmental resilience, carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (CFRTP) composites have been widely used in the aerospace industry [1][2][3][4][5]. Composite components are divided into numerous parts as per the requirements of structural design, manufacture, and maintenance of composites, as well as the limitations of the integrity molding technology. ...
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... The damage for composites with different braiding angles occurred in the braiding direction. At 25-90 °C, the damage was symmetric ±45° shear crack for 21° composite and thorough 45° shear crack for 32° composite at 25-90 °C which resulted from fiber, fiber bundles, and matrix fracture; Therefore, the 3D five-directional braided composites still kept as a whole after out-of-plane compression, which is superior to other composites with serious delaminating phenomenon, as discussed in the literature [36][37][38][39]. In addition, for both 21 • and 32 • composites, large 45 • shear cracks became gradually obscure and small cracks became more and more prevalent along fiber bundles with the rising temperature due to the stress that could not be effectively transmitted to fibers because of matrix softening. ...
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