L'habitat du Bronze final et du premier âge du Fer en Alta Rocca (étoiles: villages ouverts; croix: fortifications). 

L'habitat du Bronze final et du premier âge du Fer en Alta Rocca (étoiles: villages ouverts; croix: fortifications). 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
We present a synthetic approach to the kinds of housing found in the mountainous Alta Rocca sector of southern Corsica during the late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age. Study of protohistoric non-fortified sites in Corsica is relatively new, but the numerous projects carried out in recent years reveal the structural and developmental complexity of liv...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Le site de Weyersheim Les Hauts de la Zorn (Bas-Rhin), fouillé en 2014 par l’Inrap a livré pour la première fois en Alsace les restes d’un atelier de forge, sur un site occupé de la fin du Hallstatt et du début de La Tène ancienne. Outre la mise au jour de nombreux silos, ayant livré des artefacts céramiques et métalliques typiques, deux structures...

Citations

... The site of Cuciurpula was selected because of its acidic sediment, which is unfavourable to micro-organism activity (DeLaune et al. 1981;Moucawi et al. 1981;Drieu et al. 2018). Twelve potsherds were sampled from this open-air site dating from the end of the Bronze Age to the first half of the Iron Age and situated in the mountainous region of central south Corsica (Serra-di-Scopamena and Sorbollano, France;Peche-Quilichini et al. 2015). In-depth analysis of the ceramic fabric has not yet been carried out, but most of the pottery seems to be made of local granitic earth with a high quantity of non-plastic inclusions of variable grain size (Peche-Quilichini 2010). ...
Article
Porosity of archaeological pottery is a key parameter used to assess its ability to trap lipids during the use of the pot and to preserve them over time. Mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas chromatography were used to study the distribution of porosity and the preservation of lipids in different chrono‐cultural contexts. The data obtained show that the porosity pattern, related to the raw materials and the savoir‐faire of the potters, influences the amount of lipids accumulated in the pottery. A significant overall porosity together with a high level of small pores is generally favourable for the preservation of lipids, but variations related to the environmental context are observed.
... La Corse est pleinement intégrable à ce constat d'ensemble. Son schéma d'évolution culturelle, en tre la fin du 2 e et le début du 1 er millénaire, est marqué par un moment initial de rupture avec les codes (architecturaux, matériels et symboliques) du Bronze moyen / récent, à l'origine de nouvelles dynamiques au sein desquelles l'impact des faciès nuragiques septentrionaux et du Protovillanovien I toscan sont évidents (Peche-Quilichini 2012a;2015). Ce Bronze final 1 métissé semble par la suite se figer dans tous ses répertoires d'expression observables, alors que les relations extra-insulaires ne se traduisent plus dans les sphères de production. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a description and an attempt to contextualise representations of head and pectoral protection depicted on the statue menhirs of Corsica. These monuments are among the most representative of Corsica’s Bronze Age and hold a decisive importance in historiography. Unfortunately, no actual armour – may it be organic or made from metal – is known today from Corsica. We aim to describe and interpret the represented armour as it is seen on the menhirs and compare it with neighbouring regions such as Sardinia, from where plenty of armour depictions are known both from bronze figurines and stone stelae, but also with finds and depictions of other armour from the Mediterranean, in order to reconstruct the genesis and evolution of these armour types.
... The protohistoric site of Cuciurpula is settled on the hillside of la Punta di Cuciurpula in south central Corsica (Fig. 1). The excavations carried out between 2010 and 2015 revealed a large settlement of about 40 well-preserved structures occupied from the 12th to the 6th century BC (Late Bronze Age to the beginning of the Second Iron Age; Peche-Quilichini et al., 2015). Based on exhaustive excavation data of seven of the structures and further analysis of various artefacts, these structures have been interpreted as habitation units. ...
... These preliminary observations must be confirmed by enlarging the sampling to include other houses with clear spatial distribution of pottery at the site (e.g. House 1 and House 6; Peche-Quilichini et al., 2015) and in other sites from the first Iron Age in Corsica. ...
Article
The excavation of the protohistoric site of Cuciurpula (South Corsica, France) revealed a significant amount of potsherds, often bearing visible surface crusts, sometimes very thick. This exceptional case in the Mediterranean region, suggesting a good preservation of organic substances, provided a unique opportunity to address questions related to pottery function and natural organic substances exploited in Corsica during the first half of the 1st millennium BC. The molecular analysis (GC and GC/MS) of organic residues from three houses of the site, preserved in both pottery walls and charred surface crusts, highlighted the wide diversity and the various roles of substances contained and processed in ceramic vessels: animal fats, plant oils and waxes, beeswax, and conifer resin. These molecular data, considered together with the shapes of the vessels and their location into the habitation units, revealed the diversity of pottery function (culinary and technical) and spatial organisation of domestic activities between houses or in a house (distinction between storage and cooking areas).
Article
Full-text available
The Late Bronze Age (1700–900 BC) represents an extremely dynamic period for Mediterranean Europe. Here, we provide a comparative survey of the archaeological record of over half a millennium within the entire northern littoral of the Mediterranean, from Greece to Iberia, incorporating archaeological, archaeometric, and bioarchaeological evidence. The picture that emerges, while certainly fragmented and not displaying a unique trajectory, reveals a number of broad trends in aspects as different as social organization, trade, transcultural phenomena, and human mobility. The contribution of such trends to the processes that caused the end of the Bronze Age is also examined. Taken together, they illustrate how networks of interaction, ranging from the short to the long range, became a defining aspect of the “Middle Sea” during this time, influencing the lives of the communities that inhabited its northern shore. They also highlight the importance of research that crosses modern boundaries for gaining a better understanding of broad comparable dynamics.
Book
Full-text available
This study aims to identify what the houses of prehistoric men and women were like on the European continent. The work focuses on the physical characteristics of houses, as archaeological records are limited and ethnographical knowledge is required to correctly interpret any remains excavated.