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Levels of autonomous driving according to SAE J3016. 

Levels of autonomous driving according to SAE J3016. 

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Autonomous driving functions for motorized road vehicles represent an important area of research today. In this context, sensor and object recognition technologies for self-driving cars have to fulfill enhanced requirements in terms of accuracy, unambiguousness, robustness, space demand and of course costs. The paper introduces different levels of...

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