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Kleanthes and Schaubert plan for Athens, 1833 (Papageorgiou-­-Venetas, 2001) 

Kleanthes and Schaubert plan for Athens, 1833 (Papageorgiou-­-Venetas, 2001) 

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Conference Paper
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This study examines the role of spatial configuration in shaping patterns of immigrant segregation through the case study of Gerani, Athens. Previous research has suggested that despite its negative effects, segregation can be positive as a key mode of accommodating urban diversity. In this context, this study asks what is the role of space in shap...

Citations

... On the other hand, Gerani (Figures 3 -left) is clearly a shopping area of different character. It acts as an immigrant reception area, most of whom are passing by and who after experiencing Gerani as a stopping point continue their journey from their country to another country in Europe (Vlachou & Vaughan, 2015). Their settlement in the region has resulted in the market area catering accordingly, as required, to their needs and the needs of residents. ...
... In summary, it is clear that the above region varies considerably. Its diversity is apparent in urban morphology (Vlachou & Vaughan, 2015), in the level of urban architecture, environment quality, developing activities and social geography. These differences do not allow the area to be recognized as a unified commercial area but as a collection of sub-areas. ...
... It is also quite important that there is a considerable number of buildings not being used today ( Figure 6) which can be utilized for the development of new business in the region. Finally, the northern part of the region is a central area which is degraded with relatively low land values (Vlachou & Vaughan, 2015) which allow for easier attraction of investments, as Figure 4 illustrates. An expected outcome would be the revitalization of the grater area, taking into account the overspill effect on neighboring areas. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the last decade, Greece has been the field of a series of changes with respect to real estate and the form of retail trade. With the financial crisis and the insufficient adaptation of the local economies to the standards of globalized economy being the main cause, retail trade is experiencing changes not only in its location and organization but also its basic business unit structure, which, in the case of Greece, is SME (Small and medium-sized enterprises). One of those changes is the development of new commercial areas in the outskirts of cities in response to their declining commercial centers. Such cases are the big shopping malls and discount villages, which after being introduced in America and Europe, have also made their appearance in Greece. This practice has proved successful, since these shopping areas manage to attract a large number of visitors daily. However, it has to be pointed out that such establishments cannot serve the needs of consumers effectively due to the time-distance factor, while at the same time their inactivity during the hours and days of non-operation of the stores could be regarded as a waste of space. These issues can be mitigated through the development of open malls in city centers. This practice contributes to the simultaneous regeneration of neglected urban areas, especially in large urban agglomerations. This study is aimed at identifying and analyzing these specific issues by presenting a similar proposal for the areas known as the commercial triangle and Gerani. The aim is to define the framework for remodeling the existing Athenian commercial center in order to reduce the spatial effects of the crisis. For this reason, base information was collected via literature review in order to undertake a site analysis in which it was based the formulation of design intervention proposals. It may be noted that it was significant to examine the international experience concerning the practice of open malls, ways were identified to implement similar interventions and specific types of interventions were proposed tailored to the specific circumstances of the Athenian example.
Article
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Research shows that a variety of building types, sizes and street morphologies can support a diversified mix of uses and thus contribute to the vitality of town centres. Other studies have highlighted the special role of minority ethnic businesses in this context. This study set out to examine the relationship between spatial accessibility, commercial diversity (as a measure of land-use mixing) and minority ethnic business (MEB) diversity in ten of London’s high streets. We found that streets with a significant MEB presence were more likely to benefit from commercial diversity and that the sampled MEB units were measurably smaller in size. We also found the location of larger clusters of MEB businesses to be more accessible, both locally and across the city. The study also found three distinct types of MEB centres: ranging from high streets with a small MEB presence, others with a high rate of MEB mixing, and a third type: the ‘ethnic marketplace’, with a singular ethnic character. We conclude that greater attention should be given to designing street accessibility, lot configuration, mixed building sizes, and land-use mixing, in order to serve the long-term economic and social vitalities of local town centres.