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Job Characteristics as Predictors of Burnout

Job Characteristics as Predictors of Burnout

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Citations

... At an individual level, burnout has been associated with mental and physical health problems, for example, psychological distress, anxiety, depression, reduced self‐esteem [3]. At an organization level, burnout is also consistently linked to negative attitudes towards work, which include low levels of motivation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment, but high levels of job uncertainty [4]. These in turn induce counter‐productive work behavior, such as reduced productivity, absenteeism and staff turnover and hence lower the overall effectiveness of the organization itself [5]. ...
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Work life takes up an important place in human life, and an employee faces many stimuli from internal and external environments and is affected by them in a positive or negative way. Aim: was to investigate relationship among nurses role overload , burnout and managerial coping strategies at Intensive Care Units in Assiut University Hospital. Design: A descriptive design was used. Setting: Four Intensive Care Units in Assiut University Hospital. Subjects: Included all nurses working in Causality, General, & Postoperative Intensive Care Units and Coronary Care Unit in Assiut University Hospital. Tools: Four tools which includes Socio-demographic data sheet, role overload questionnaire, managerial coping strategies & burnout questionnaires. Results: Showed that role overload had highest mean score in General and Casuality ICUs. In addition, coping strategies highest mean scores of rational problem solving , resigned distancing, and seeking support/ventilation were in Casuality and post operative ICUs respectively except passive wishful thinking had highest mean scores in General and Casuality ICUs respectively. Also, burnout had highest mean scores in post operative and general ICU respectively. Conclusions: Nurses employed at ICUs in Assiut University Hospital reported high burnout and use managerial coping strategies as rational problem solving, resigned distancing, seeking support/ ventilation and passive wishful thinking to handle burnout and role overload except passive wishful thinking not used with role overload. Four tools were used to collect data for this study as follows: 1st tool : Socio-demographic data sheet: This part includes socio-demographic characteristics data as: age, sex , unit name, marital status, educational qualification, and years of experience. 2nd tool : Role overload questionnaire which developed by [11], it included five items. The Scoring system of this tool was five-point Likert-scale ranging from “strongly disagree” (1) to “strongly agree” (5). 3rd tool : Managerial coping strategies questionnaire which developed by [12] , it included twenty nine items classified into four factors. Rational problem solving, resigned distancing, seeking support/ventilation and passive wishful thinking. The Scoring system of the this study tool was four-point scale in the following sequence (0 = not used, 1= used somewhat, 2 = used quite a bit, 3 = used a great deal), and 4th tool: Burnout questionnaire which developed by [13], it included twenty two items. The Scoring system of this study tool was five-point Likert-scale ranging from “Not important” (1) to “More important” (5). Their reliability was assessed in a pilot study by measuring their internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient method. This turned to be 0.88 for coping strategies, 0.90 for burnout, and 0.96 for role overload, thus indicating a high degree of reliability .The validity was measured by five experts in the field of nursing administration.
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... In recent years the construction industry has been aware of the work-life balance issue in human resource management [3] . Empirical research on work-life balance in terms of construction professionals' burnout experience has been conducted in different social cultural contexts such as Australia [4][5][6][7][8] , Hong Kong [9][10][11] , UK [12] , and New Zealand [13] . This study extends the study of construction professionals' burnout to the cultural context of the Netherlands. ...
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... Architecture and engineering firms were warned to "stop burnout before it stops your employees" (Design Firm Management & Administration Report, 2002). In a series of studies that followed, construction professionals were found to be 3 experiencing rather high levels of burnout (Lingard, 2003;Lingard and Francis, 2005;Yip and Rowlinson, 2006;Yip et al., 2005b). Burnout is costly for the individuals who are experiencing it and for the organizations whose staffs are experiencing it. ...
... This is the exact situation construction organizations in Hong Kong faced during the recent recession. In this context, it is perhaps not surprising to find construction professionals reporting significantly higher levels of burnout than other occupations (Yip and Rowlinson, 2006). In view of the negative implications burnout has on individuals and organizations, it is therefore important to devise intervention strategies to minimize the burnout phenomenon, together with its negative attributes. ...
... Although construction professionals have been found to experience high levels of burnout (Yip and Rowlinson, 2006), little research has so far been attempted to identify what coping strategies these individuals have adopted and their respective moderating effects on the relationship between occupational stressors and consequential burnout. It is therefore important to understand how some construction professionals cope better than others in the presence of role overload, apparently without developing symptoms of burnout, in respect to their coping strategies. ...
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The moderating effect coping strategies have on the relationship between role overload and burnout was investigated in a sample of 222 professional engineers in the construction industry. A four-factor model of coping strategies, based on the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) revised scale, was identified to consist of rational problem solving, resigned distancing, seeking support/ventilation and passive wishful thinking. The results revealed that only rational problem solving significantly moderated the relationship between role overload and all three dimensions of burnout, i.e. emotional exhaustion, cynicism and reduced professional efficacy; whereas the moderating effect of resigned distancing and seeking support/ventilation was significant only on emotional exhaustion and cynicism respectively. Passive wishful thinking failed to demonstrate a significant moderating effect on any of the burnout dimensions at all. The importance and methods of incorporating effective coping strategies as a successful intervention for managing burnout at individual, organizational and institutional levels are discussed.
Chapter
The current chapter is organized according to the crucial factors representing the construction workers’ health integral models. These models describe some of the critical health risks associated with the works in construction and highlight the need for implementing adequate control measures for the recognized hazards even though the incidence of the risks associated with the construction workers’ health, and management is mostly focused on mitigation of the incidents/accident associated; that is concentrating on worker’s safety instead of issues related to health. Thus, it is essential to systematically manage and identify hazards related to health in the working areas. The present chapter considers the association between health in the workplace and risks calling diseases related to lifestyle, which frequently attract interest in the health programs. These programs are appraised critically, and occupational health in the construction industries have been highlighted as these factors connect to the organization’s and design to address the health workers’ problems.
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This research investigated and compared the experience of job burnout among 249 construction engineers working within consulting and contracting organizations in Hong Kong. The most widely recognized model of burnout, comprising emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and diminished professional efficacy was found to be valid. The sample in this study scored highest in all three dimensions of burnout among nine other occupations in national samples, with engineers working within contracting organizations reporting higher levels of burnout than their fellow engineers working within consulting organizations. The results of the study also showed that burnout attributed largely to stressors associated with job conditions and working environments. In particular, qualitative overload and lack of promotion prospects were found to be the major predictors of job burnout among engineers working within consulting organizations; whereas long working hours, role conflict, role ambiguity, and lack of job security accounted mostly for the burnout among engineers within contracting organizations. This suggested that intervention strategies targeting minimizing burnout, such as job redesign, should be devised with reference to the type of the engineering organizations.