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Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre (New Caledonia, 1991/1998): The Centre followed two main guidelines – Kanak vernacular knowledge in construction competencies, on the other hand making use of modern materials, such as glass, aluminum, steel and advanced lightweight technologies (in addition to traditional materials wood and stone). These buildings strongly express the harmonious relationship with the environment that typifies the Kanak-tribe culture.

Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre (New Caledonia, 1991/1998): The Centre followed two main guidelines – Kanak vernacular knowledge in construction competencies, on the other hand making use of modern materials, such as glass, aluminum, steel and advanced lightweight technologies (in addition to traditional materials wood and stone). These buildings strongly express the harmonious relationship with the environment that typifies the Kanak-tribe culture.

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Vernacular buildings across the globe provide instructive examples of sustainable solutions to building problems. Yet, these solutions are assumed to be inapplicable to modern buildings. Despite some views to the contrary, there continues to be a tendency to consider innovative building technology as the hallmark of modern architecture because trad...

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... design approach responds to the site, the wind, and the sun, and he professes to share the aboriginal philosophy "touch the earth lightly." In another contemporary example, Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cul- tural Centre (Figure 2), Renzo Piano creates a seemingly impossible link between the high-tech and the vernacular through a successful fusion of material, form, technology and planning ideas borrowed from the vernacular knowledge of the Kanak tribe (Wines and Jodidio, 2000, 126). ...

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... The vernacular design studies across the arid climate worldwide have emphasized the importance of a climate-conscious approach to building design to accomplish human comfort without excessive use of natural resources. The studies showed that using different techniques and local materials will support the implementation of sustainable vernacular design concepts in any arid zone worldwide and prove that the concepts are flexible to adapt to the local identity into one complex entity (Rashid and Ara 2015). ...
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