Jean-Louis, Fabiola. "Marie Antoinette is Dead," from the series Re-Writing History: Paper Gowns and Photographs. Archival pigment print, unframed. 2017. http://www.fabiolajeanlouis.com/rewriting-historycolor-prints

Jean-Louis, Fabiola. "Marie Antoinette is Dead," from the series Re-Writing History: Paper Gowns and Photographs. Archival pigment print, unframed. 2017. http://www.fabiolajeanlouis.com/rewriting-historycolor-prints

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Al igual que la traductología feminista, los estudios recientes en las intersecciones de las teorías feministas y de la moda ofrecen nuevas formas de pensar la historia de la modernidad, el cuerpo y la comunicación en ámbitos interpersonales y transnacionales. La moda y la traducción comparten atributos similares en el imaginario popular: ambas son...

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... Fabiola Jean-Louis's 2018 photographic art piece "Marie Antoinette is dead," a Black woman stares tranquilly ahead as she reclines in a chaise longue positioned in front of heavy, gilded, baroque curtains ( Figure 1). The woman's creased blue petticoat is trimmed with a pink chintz pattern that billows out beyond the frame of the image-in one hand (against her ribboned bodice) she cradles a Black doll in a West-African-style print dress while the other delicately encloses a nosegay of bluewhite flowers. ...

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... The distribution of the selected studies on translation of novels and feminism by year is shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 illustrates the significant rise from 2019 onwards, in the number of interdisciplinary studies on feminist theory and translation of novels (see for example Mei (2019), Qing Qiu (2019), Li and Zhang (2019), and Baya (2019)). However, the number of studies remained constant in 2010, 2013, 2016, and 2017 (including two studies each year, see for example Paleczek (2010Paleczek ( ), and in 2005Paleczek ( , 2007Paleczek ( , 2009Paleczek ( , 2011Paleczek ( , 2014 (including one study each year, see for example Li (2007). ...
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Feminist translation theory demeans the culture of the patriarchal hegemony of translation. The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate the main trends in the studies on feminism and literary translation, and to analyse the main ways through which feminist translation theory has been applied by various researchers in the studies of translated novels. To this end, the databases of EBSCO, ProQuest, Taylor and Francis, ETHOS, and Google Scholar have been explored, and thirty-three studies published between 2005 and 2021 have been analysed. A systematic review was used as a research methodology, and the studies were analysed using a content analysis method. The findings revealed that there are very few significant studies on feminism and translation of novels, and at least until the sharp increase in interest in research in the field emerged in 2019. Moreover, other studies have concluded that feminist translation theory has focused on examining the impact of gender consciousness and translator ideology on the translation process, exploring feminist translation strategies, and analysing the transmission of gendered language in the translated text. The findings have provided feminist and translation studies researchers with a comprehensive understanding of the current state of applied feminist translation theory in the studies addressing translated novels.