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-It's a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock and Roll), Instrumental call and response.

-It's a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock and Roll), Instrumental call and response.

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Conference Paper
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This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study, conducted in Australia, which embarked on the task of detecting and defining aspects of Australian guitar culture. This was undertaken by identifying and locating musically notate-able, quintessentially Australian guitar performance styles through an analytical look at the music of historica...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... guitar playing in this song is typical of Blues derived CPM, yet a notable feature of the song is the use of Bagpipes. Figure 1 shows the call and response section between Angus Young's guitar and the bagpipes. (Scott, Young & Young, 1975). ...
Context 2
... referred to as the Spanish triplet, the tresillo rhythm pattern is a simplification of the Afro-Cuban Habanera and found its way, partly, into Australian CPM through the influence of the Rockabilly movement with artists including Bill Haley and Elvis Presley using it prominently (Brewer, 1999). Figure 13 shows two forms of the tresillo rhythm as typically found in CPM guitar performance styles. In early adoptions of the tresillo in New Orleans Blues and Jump Blues, precursors to Rhythm and Blues, the rhythmic pattern was typically played by the horn sections. ...
Context 3
... Figure 17 shows this harmonic device used in the construction of the chorus. Australian guitarists. ...

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