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International Donor Worker Perceptions versus Organizational Trends by Target Population 

International Donor Worker Perceptions versus Organizational Trends by Target Population 

Citations

... By focusing on a unique empirical context, we extend our understanding of how SI develops in volatile institutional contexts where international actors largely dictate the rules (Arda and Banerjee, 2021). Our results specifically extend previous literature, which discovered an unequal relationship between donors and grant recipients in Palestine (Atia and Herrold, 2018;Nakhleh, 1989), and found that local PNGOs use donors' funds to implement the donors' agenda (De Voir and Tartir, 2009). Palestinian policymakers and NGOs advocates have been questioning the social and economic impacts of the international philanthropic funds to NGOs in the last three decades, and whether the dominant model they have adapted since the 1980s, which is based on grants from international donors, has changed. ...
Article
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Purpose – This paper focuses on social innovation dynamics in extreme contexts where institutional volatility is deeply rooted and enduring. In other words, the authors focus their discussion on the challenges that social innovators are facing in their endeavor of solving wicked social problems within an extreme institutional environment. This research is guided by the following question: How does an extreme institutional environment influence social innovation processes? Design/methodology/approach – This qualitative research builds on the unique case of the Palestinian non-governmental organization (NGO) sector, a rarely studied context in organizational studies. The authors combine archival sources with 24 semi-structured interviews with Palestinian NGOs. Findings – The authors theorize three barriers that hinder social innovation in such contexts: institutional trap, effectiveness trap and sustainability trap. The authors also theorize five mechanisms through which these barriers influence each other dynamically: mingling, surviving, undermining, binding and reinforcing. Taken together, these barriers and mechanisms shed light on social innovation processes taking place within extreme institutional environments. Research limitations/implications – The main limitation of this study is the methodological design, based on an extreme single case-study which, on a bunch of features, is quite unique in the world. The authors argue that the results are all the same transferable to other relatively similar contexts. Practical implications – By theorizing the institutional barriers to social innovation in an extreme institutional context, the research thus sheds light on how social innovation could be sustained and stimulated in Palestine and other contexts that face similar institutional challenges. Social implications – From an engaged scholarship perspective, studying Palestine cannot be more relevant than today considering the turmoil in which Palestinians are. The research thus provides a deeper understanding of organizational and institutional dynamics with crucial social repercussions. Originality/value – The social innovation literature has overemphasized success stories to the detriment of the struggles that hinder social innovations in extreme institutional environments. By focusing on the barriers that social innovators experience in these contexts, the authors provide novel empirical insight. Furthermore, this study enriches the understanding of the institutional dynamics of social innovations by proposing a process model that elucidates how an extreme institutional context can influence social innovations.
... With an official development assistance-to-gross domestic product ratio of 25.5 per cent, Palestine is ranked 12th among the world's most aid-dependent countries and economies (OECD 2018). This dependence has led the Palestinian economy to be structurally dependent on foreign aid (Devoir and Tartir 2009). Moreover, despite the massive amount of aid that Palestine receives, it is still unclear whether the existing coordination structure in Palestine is efficient in responding to local needs and priorities, not to mention fulfilling commitments to achieving the SDGs. ...
Book
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The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the enormous challenges humanity is facing. It has been facilitated by other crises as climate change, biodiversity loss, economic exploitation, and increased inequity and inequality. The UN Agenda 2030 and the Paris Agreement on climate change call for transformational change of our societies, our economies and our interaction with the environment. Evaluation is tasked to bring rigorous evidence to support transformation at all levels, from local to global. This book explores how the future of the evaluation profession can take shape in 18 chapters from authors from all over the world, from North and South, East and West, and from Indigenous and Decolonized voices to integrative perspectives for a truly sustainable future. It builds on what was discussed at the IDEAS Global Assembly in October 2019 in Prague and follows through by opening trajectories towards supporting transformation aimed at solving the global crises of our times.
... By 2000, funding increased to USD 80-110 million due to the increase in Arab and Islamic aid to mitigate the impact of the the Second Intifada (Abdelkarim, 2002). However, NGOs recieved in one decade (1999 -2008), a total of USD 13.4 billion (DeVoir & Tartir, 2009) although it is unclear if this figure also accounts for aid delivered through international agencies (e.g. UNRWA, UN agencies , and INGOs) or its distribution between the West Bank and Gaza Strip regions, although it is expected that the Gaza Strip recieived a smaller share due to the larger population in the West Bank. ...
... The funding increase to urban CSOs (from 25% to 40%) in the 1990s was also aimed at rural areas but studies show that NGOs dedicated less than 40% of their resources to rural areas. Due to the scale of UNRWA operations, NGOs are less functional in the refugee camps (DeVoir & Tartir, 2009 sectoral distribution, NGOs engage in rights-based sector received about 30% of donor funding followed by social services and welfare (26%). NGOs involved in economic development, education and humanitarian assistance/relief recieved 22%, 14% and 9% of aid funds, respectively (DeVoir & Tartir, 2009). ...
... Due to the scale of UNRWA operations, NGOs are less functional in the refugee camps (DeVoir & Tartir, 2009 sectoral distribution, NGOs engage in rights-based sector received about 30% of donor funding followed by social services and welfare (26%). NGOs involved in economic development, education and humanitarian assistance/relief recieved 22%, 14% and 9% of aid funds, respectively (DeVoir & Tartir, 2009). ...
Article
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This article examines the situation of Palestinian NGOs before 2012 through a review over the NGO sector and their regulation, governance and relationship to various stakeholders that the sector is expected to be accountable for. This article sheds light on Palestinian organizations to classify the sector's vulnerability. It also sheds some light on the multiple factors behind the contentious relationship between NGOs and public authorities on the one hand, and between NGOs and the general public on the other hand. The article uses a combination of a quantitative and qualitative methodology and mixed data collection methods from primary and secondary sources for the purposes of clarifying the governance situation of NGOs. The controversy surrounding Palestinian NGOs are because of their motivation, agendas and sources of funds. One of the factors that increases the suspicion is the fact that its board of directors and its director intrude from the Palestinian public and withhold information from them. In the period referred to, the Palestinian Authority closes organizations that support Islamic view and liquidates their resources, while tens of new PA supporter’s organizations have created, receives financial support from the PA., and others emerged that were established for personal purposes, maintaining a relationship with the current of power, and the legal framework and governance framework for NGOs remained left on the shelf and used for opponents/ one major finding is that the NGOs sector is able to serve the and helps in fulfulling public needs and strategic national interests if they choose to despite the changes in the national political situations and the pressures imposed from the authorities and donors. The study contributes positively to the understanding of NGOs as a sector. Its clafry the challanages and the weaknesses of the NGO sector and call for more foucs on seving public needs.
... The number and size of both dump sites and organized landfills are limited due to a lack of space and the need to protect water resources (Yassin et al., 2006). The GS relies heavily on external money transfers (De Voir and Tartir, 2009;World Bank, 2018), which are frequently tied to the obligation to purchase modern waste processing technologies from the donating countries. The GS urgently needs to implement an SWM system, but any system is likely to fail if it is not accepted by the population. ...
Article
•Local population is not willing to separate their waste from the source. •Those who abided to pro-environmental behavior, feel more self-content. •Paradoxically, individuals do not feel responsible for improving their situation. •Recycling and reuse behavior of impoverished consumers is on a comparably low level. •Inadequate SWM services are perceived to affect the well-being of the population.
... The number and size of both dump sites and organized landfills are limited due to a lack of space and the need to protect water resources (Yassin et al., 2006). The GS relies heavily on external money transfers (De Voir and Tartir, 2009;World Bank, 2018), which are frequently tied to the obligation to purchase modern waste processing technologies from the donating countries. The GS urgently needs to implement an SWM system, but any system is likely to fail if it is not accepted by the population. ...
Article
Solid waste management (SWM) services present a challenge in the Gaza Strip (GS), where the infrastructure is inadequate and currently operating landfills are overloaded. This paper examines the solid waste disposal behavior of poor people living in GS refugee camps. A total of 180 semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted in the eight camps to collect primary data relevant to SWM and to provide a novel account of the routine events, decisions, emotions, and cognitions related to the disposal of basic household items. A majority of the interviewees (88%) perceive a link between their wellbeing and proper waste disposal behavior. The respondents are aware of the adverse impact of improper waste disposal on their health and the surrounding environment, and, despite their limited financial resources, they expressed a willingness to pay for proper SWM services. Current waste disposal practices do not involve separating waste, and heads of households are not keen on encouraging their family members to do so. Only a small fraction of the interviewees (23%) are aware of any environmental initiatives although all confirmed their concern about the underlying environmental and health issues. All interviewees expressed their substantial dissatisfaction with current disposal practices, and the findings reveal that the interviewees who engage in pro-environmental behavior are more content. Poor people living in camps tend to dispose of their possessions in three main ways: giving away, throwing away, and selling their items. These methods should be further investigated to assess their feasibility with regard to overcoming the current SWM challenge.
... Between 1999 and 2008, international aid to the West Bank and Gaza Strip increased by over 600% to US$3.25 billion per year. During the same time period, external aid to Palestinian NGOs increased by over 500% from US$48 million in 1999 to US$257 million in 2008 (De Voir & Tartir, 2009). The number of NGOs also mushroomed after Oslo and the period witnessed the transformation of grassroots mobilization to professionally managed NGOs as a result of conditional international funding. ...
Article
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In this article, we examine the shifting roles played by non-state actors in governing areas of limited statehood. In particular, we focus on the emergence of voluntary grassroots organizations in Palestine and describe how regimes of international development aid transformed these organizations into professional nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that created new forms of colonial control. Based on in-depth interviews with 145 NGO members and key stakeholders and a historical analysis of limited statehood in Palestine, we found that social relations became disembedded from the local context and re-embedded in new relations with international donor organizations resulting in a depoliticized public sphere. NGOization of the economy also resulted in new forms of exclusion and inclusion as well as contestations between a new class of urban middle-class professionals working in NGOs and the older generation of activists who were involved in grassroots organizations. Our findings have implications for business and human rights and governance in areas of limited statehood, in particular how private actors such as NGOs are able to exercise power in the economy.
... Face à ces critiques contestataires, une littérature critique, correctrice, a été développée par les bailleurs eux-mêmes et le NDC, dont l'objectif est d'éviter une remise en cause profonde du système de l'aide et du projet politico-économique qui lui est associé . Dans leurs rapports, la BM comme le PNUD justifient la détérioration de la situation économique des TPO par les effets pervers de l'aide, et notamment le grand nombre de bailleurs, leur manque de coordination et la concurrence entre eux - comme le soulignent les plans de Salam Fayyad (déjà cité) et l'étude de De Voir et Tartir, [84] financée et publiée par le NDC . S'y rejoignent certains chercheurs qui inscrivent leurs travaux dans une perspective de recommandation et de do no harm, [85] en adoptant une posture d'expertise [86] . ...
... A total of nearly US$30 billion of international aid has been committed to Palestine during the period 1993-2015. Of this, only a tiny amount has been directly committed to the agricultural sector: between 1994 and 2000 only 1.41% of aid was allocated to agriculture; between 2000 and 2005 the average allocation was 0.74%; and between 2005 and 2009 only 0.9% on average was committed ( DeVoir and Tartir, 2009;Tartir et al., 2012;Kurzom, 2017). ...
Chapter
This volume sets out to explore the dialectic relating agriculture, crisis and conflict, and attempts to expand the knowledge on these interactions. Part 1 of the volume (chapters 1-6) discusses thematic issues and methodological approaches to understanding the intersection of agriculture, crisis and conflict. Part 2 (chapters 7-20) provides case studies that take a detailed approach to understanding agricultural contexts facing crisis and conflict, or the role played by agriculture within crisis and conflict. Studies are selected from areas that might be expected to feature in such a volume (the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and Latin America) as well as less obvious regions where conflict within agriculture refers not to widespread violence or wars but rather latent or simmering crisis (Central Asia and Europe). Crises stemming from politically-driven violence, natural disasters and climate change are covered, as well as competition over resources.
... The United States contributed $16 million in bilateral aid between 1977 and 1983(Mansour, 1988).20 Jordan provided foreign aid by maintaining the payroll of its former employees(Brynen, 2000). The PLO, which raised money with the Palestine National Fund through a 5-percent tax on Palestinian labor throughout the Gulf, had a significant windfall during the 1970s and 1980s from Arab nations following increases in oil prices(Brynen, 2000; Challand, 2008 [cited in DeVoir andTartir, 2009]). Until 1990, Arab countries did not contribute to the UNRWA because they thought that Israel should be responsible for the plight of the Palestinians(Zanotti, 2013).21 ...
... Palestinian NGOs are heavily dependent on foreign funding, both Western and nonWestern, which accounts for 78 percent of their revenues. 14 ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Public services in the West Bank and Gaza have shown an outstanding level of resilience that is likely to continue even if security, political, or economic situations deteriorate. This piece was prepared for a workshop on long­term trends in Palestine held in Amman, Jordan, in September 2014.